The mission of Water Charity is to implement immediate, efficient, and practical projects around the world to provide safe water and effective sanitation to those in need.


52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 19 Thiawando, Community Well

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project #19 Thiawando, Community WellThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Thiawando, Kaolack, Senegal

Community Description
Pump #11 was our first project in this village, and if you go back and look at some of the pictures you’ll notice it was quite a bit greener the first time around. That’s the difference here between the rainy season and dry season, and why access to water is so incredibly crucial for local populations. Here in Thiawando things are very hot and dry but the population is still just as wonderful, hospitable, and hopeful as ever.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project #19 Thiawando, Community WellThey are still hoping to start a community garden around the first well, but even before that happens several individuals are gardening in their homes and the pump is being thoroughly appreciated by the local cattle. It had some problems briefly and the women were up in arms until the village repaired it showing just how appreciated it was.

This is a village of over 800 people and with such a large population one pump on one well is helpful but it isn’t fully meeting the needs here.

Project Description
There is a second well in the village about 100 m from the first which is actually slightly shallower and larger. This means that the pump should work even better here than on the first well.

The plan is to install this second pump to further increase access to fresh clean water and facilitate the future establishment of a second gardening space. This pump will also help to provide those living on the outskirts of the village with closer access to water. An extra 100 m to walk to the far pump doesn’t sound like all that much, but it sure feels like a lot with 40 liters of water on your head.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project #19 Thiawando, Community WellProject Impact
All 800 residents will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Garrison Harward and C.J. Pederson

Comments

Dollar Amount of Project
$100.00

Donations Collected to Date
$100.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Vicki Ringer, of Woodland Hills, CA, USA.

If you now contribute $150 (our new price, which includes labor), your name will be placed on the waiting list to adopt the next project in order.

If you wish to contribute less than $150, the money will be applied toward the overall program.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of Pempe Rainwater Catchment Project – Suriname

Conclusion of Pempe Rainwater Catchment Project – SurinameThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Erica D'Aquila. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project was to install 43 rainwater catchment systems to provide clean drinking water for the residents of Pempe.

Erica reports:

Once full funding was reached, one member from the planning committee traveled to the city with me at his own expense to embark on a 3-day-long endeavor of purchasing the project materials.

Upon arrival of the project materials in Pempe, all community members worked together in carrying and distributing the project materials. Community members worked for two days transporting 1,376 cement stones from the neighboring community to Pempe and then to the individual areas where the systems were to be set up.

The two male community members responsible for the installation of the systems received training in how to construct the system’s stands as well as DuroTank “houses” for homes that were not high enough off the ground to accommodate the system.

The two laborers successfully installed all 43 rainwater catchment systems, including 6 systems that required the additional Durotank houses. During this installation period, the community members continued to work together in assisting the two male community members who installed the systems.

After all tanks were set up, community meetings were held to discuss the importance of making certain lifestyle changes now that the community was equipped with the catchment systems. These included using rain water to brush teeth, cooking needs, and drinking needs. Other topics discussed at the meetings were water conservation and necessary maintenance in order to ensure that the water caught by these systems is as clean as it can be and lasts year round (despite change in rainfall).

From this project, the community has gained a sense of confidence and accomplishment as their constant involvement and collaboration was extremely influential to the project’s success. Moving forward, community members will be able to apply their new skills of project planning, proposing, assessment, execution, and implementation to other needs in the community.

The community of Pempe and I would like to sincerely express our gratitude to Water Charity.

We wish to thank Erica for completing this project, and again extend our gratitude to the SLOW LIFE Foundation for providing the funding.

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 18 - Faraba, Moringa Garden (Part 2)

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 18 - Faraba, Moringa Garden (Part 2)This project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to place a second water pump in the Faraba Moringa Garden to enable the women’s group that works there to start its own vegetable garden.

Marcie reports:

The pump installation for #18 went very smoothly and so we figured we would talk a little about what moringa is and why a moringa garden is useful.

Moringa Oleifera is an amazingly nutritious tree with a variety of uses. One may not see this tree as something special, as it is slender, doesn’t grow very high, doesn’t provide much shade and seems a bit flimsy, but they eyes can be deceiving. One can eat immature seed-pods like one would green beans, make oil from the seeds that is used in many beauty products, filter water, produce fodder for animals, and even treat malnutrition with its leaf powder. The moringa tree is considered one of the world’s most useful trees as almost every single aspect of the tree can be used for something beneficial.

When consumed moringa has 7 times the vitamin C that is in an orange, 13 times the vitamin A in spinach, 3 times the potassium in a banana, and 2 times the protein of yogurt. This is a major malnutrition-fighting tree, as it even helps new mothers produce more breast milk. Leaves can be eaten fresh, cooked, or stored as dried powder for many months without refrigeration, and reportedly without loss of nutritional value. Moringa is especially promising as a food source in the tropics because the tree is in full leaf at the end of the dry season when other foods are typically scarce.

Ballal Agribusiness and their women’s groups are working a three-fold operation with moringa. They are growing intensive beds for leaf harvest and powder production, collecting seed for oil production and producing animal feed from oil production remnants.

Pump Output: 39 Liters/ Min

Total Number of People Benefiting: 25

Funder: Julia Chung-Lun in honor of Water Charity’s Executive Director Dr. Jacqueline Chan

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 18 - Faraba, Moringa Garden (Part 2)Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 18 - Faraba, Moringa Garden (Part 2)

Conclusion of Zamblala Community Latrine Project – Mali

Conclusion of Zamblala Community Latrine Project – MaliThis project was completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Pilar Lyons. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project was to build 30 improved latrines in a rural Minianka village.

Pilar reports:

The latrine project has been completed.

The initial phase involved the purchase of the brick mold in the capitol and the first wave of supplies in the local city. After that, cement was purchased as necessary.

The actual process began when each household spent 2-3 days digging the latrine pit and collecting the raw materials. The trained Water and Sanitation Committee member then arrived with the cement, brick mold, rebar, and tools necessary to construct the bricks and slab, making sure to measure the dimensions of the pit and its distance from the closest well.

Conclusion of Zamblala Community Latrine Project – MaliAfter that, the household had to water the bricks and slab every day for a week. During that week, the soak away pit was also dug.

At the end of the week, the committee member returned to lay the bricks and add the slab. At this time, the remaining floor space in the latrine was covered with a layer of concrete and the rocks and pipe were installed in the soak away pit.

The project built the skills of training committee members in masonry techniques and project design and management. In addition, each household in the community learned latrine maintenance and is now able to practice simple masonry techniques often used in sanitation work.

We again wish to thank The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust for providing the funding for this project.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 18 - Faraba, Moringa Garden (Part 2)

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 18 - Faraba, Moringa Garden (Part 2)This project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Faraba, Kolda, Senegal

Community Description
Smack in the middle of two villages is a vast stretch of farmland. About 95 men and women farm here during the rainy season, but only 7 garden during the dry season because of a lack of water. The 7 lucky gardeners own plots near the river so during the dry season they easily pull water. One of these plots, owned by Mamadou Barry (who we learned about in the last post) and Ballal Agribusiness, is serving as a Moringa garden, community learning space, and a women’s group garden. This is the second of the two pumps installed here.

Project Description
We are placing a second water pump in the Faraba Moringa Garden to enable the women’s group that works there to start its own vegetable garden. The members will plant onions, okra, and hot pepper then harvest and sell them in the Kolda market.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 18 - Faraba, Moringa Garden (Part 2)Project Impact
18 women and 7 men and their families will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jacob Rice, Gregg Mathews, Mary Martin-Mabry, and Marcie Todd

Comments
This will greatly benefit the nutrition of the families in the group by providing adequate water to irrigate the vegetable garden during the dry season.

Dollar Amount of Project
$100.00

Donations Collected to Date
$100.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Julia Chung-Lun, of Sydney, Australia, in honor of Jacqueline Chan, USA.

If you now contribute $150 (our new price, which includes labor), your name will be placed on the waiting list to adopt the next project in order.

If you wish to contribute less than $150, the money will be applied toward the overall program.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of Sya Bright Future Primary School Water Tank Project – Uganda

Conclusion of Sya Bright Future Primary School Water Tank Project – UgandaThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Jesse Coker. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project was to build 20,000 liter water tank at the school.

Jesse reports:

We have completed our water tank! The project went very well, with the kids always eager to watch the process from start to finish.

Before the tank construction had begun, we consulted with the customer about tank placement, size, usage, and management. After finalizing and receiving a deposit, we collected the materials needed for brick making (sand, subsoil, and cement) and foundation laying (aggregate and larger rocks). We also took a trip to town for the materials we needed to purchase (wire mesh, iron bars, cement, etc.). Then we were ready to begin.

Brick making is a fairly simple process of mixing the sifted subsoil with the right amount of cement (5-10% of total mixture), and compressing the mix in our machine. One bag of cement will produce between 100 and 120 bricks. The bricks weigh about 25 pounds each.

After the bricks are made, they need to cure for at least two days before they are used. About a quarter of the bricks that we make need to be made with an insert so that the interlock is deeper and can receive an iron bar every third course for improving the holding strength of the tanks.

As some of the workers were making bricks, others were digging the foundation and filling it first with large foundation rocks. The next day, a mix of cement and aggregate was poured into the rocks, about 18 inches deep.

A day after setting the foundation, the brick coursework began. Obviously, the diameter of the circle differs with tank size, and with our 20,000 Liter capacity this meant a diameter of eleven feet and a height of approximately eight feet. I think the tank is slightly larger than we agreed on.

Bricks were laid as level as possible, with between five and ten centimeters of cement separating the courses. This was challenging to convince the builders to follow, as they are used to building with traditional bricks, which require much more cement because of their lack of strength and uniformity. For this particular tank, we laid 22 courses of 38 bricks each.

After the coursework was complete, the inside of the tank was lined with chicken wire and then plastered with waterproof cement. A metallic support pipe was also positioned so as to support the roof when built.

After plastering, the workers moved to the outside of the tank and wrapped the outside with connected sheets of heavy-duty wire mesh. This is another step that reinforces the holding strength of the tanks.

More plastering was done on top of the wire mesh, and more bricks were laid at the base of the tank to act as a veranda. This serves as protection from water runoff.

The tap area was dug out also, with a drainage pipe laid underground for eight feet, leading to some rocks for proper drainage into the soil.

When plastering was finished, the work moved to the roof. Iron bars were crisscrossed back and forth and a thick plastic liner was placed underneath the bars. Wire mesh and chicken wire were also placed atop the bars in order to hold the cement to be subsequently applied.

Holes were created for gutters to enter and to access the inside of the tank for periodic cleaning. A rough cast of cement was sprayed to prevent cracking of the cement as it dries. Finally, the cover was placed on top of the roof to prevent sunlight, animals, and other debris from spoiling water quality.

This completed our tank construction process. Our first customer, Sya Bright Future Primary School, is thrilled with the job we have done.

Our team of builders is gaining new skills as they become more and more familiar with this methodology, and is planning new projects.

The school has been very appreciative to me, and asked me to thank you also.

We, in turn, are grateful to Jesse for completing this terrific project, which hopefully will act as a model for future projects to come.

Conclusion of Sya Bright Future Primary School Water Tank Project – UgandaConclusion of Sya Bright Future Primary School Water Tank Project – Uganda
Conclusion of Sya Bright Future Primary School Water Tank Project – UgandaConclusion of Sya Bright Future Primary School Water Tank Project – Uganda
Conclusion of Sya Bright Future Primary School Water Tank Project – UgandaConclusion of Sya Bright Future Primary School Water Tank Project – Uganda

Secretary Clinton Announces Commitment to Water Issues



In her speech on World Water Day, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton reiterated that “More than 5,000 people die each day from causes linked to unsafe water, sanitation, and hygiene, and most of them are children. Millions of women and girls walk for hours every day to collect water for their households, and some of them put their very lives and physical safety at risk.”

She stated that “Water challenges are most obvious in developing nations, but they affect every country on earth.”

“Experts predict that by 2025, nearly two-thirds of the world's population will be water-stressed.”

“We need to work together to leverage the efforts of other nations, the international community, and partners in the nonprofit and private sectors.”

She announced the launch of the U.S. Water Partnership, under which all sectors will work together to resolve the world’s water problems.

Water Charity is proud to be a part of this effort.

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 17 – Faraba, Moringa Garden

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 17 – Faraba, Moringa GardenThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

Marcie reports:

We’ve explained the process of installing pumps in great detail many times, so with this install going so smoothly we thought we’d take extra time to explain the background of our wonderful partner organization for this pump.

Ballal Agribusiness is committed to developing female farmers with the best agricultural practices because trained farmers produce better crops, feed their families and strengthen communities. They have three main areas of focus: cowpea production, community banking and Moringa Powder. Currently, Ballal is working with 18 communities and plans to expand to 21 this rainy season.

By supplying farmers with the best practices of growing profitable and nutritious food for local consumption, Ballal Agribusiness helps farmers increase production of already locally grown crops and gives them a fair price for their labors.

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 17 – Faraba, Moringa GardenCommunity Banking is a significant portion of the Ballal mission. It is extremely important that women not only have access to money, but also have support in understanding how to save, spend, and make money most efficiently.

The banking system is set up in the following way:

  1. The women’s group gathers to talk about what they want as a community.  They talk about the ups and downs to creating a community bank.
  2. If they agree that the community bank will work for their group, each woman adds 500 CFA (approximately $1) to the pot.  The pot is usually anywhere from 10,000 CFA to 15,000 CFA ($20-30).
  3. The money each woman has contributed is recorded along with the initial total amount.  All funds are immediately lent.  No one person stores the money.  4-6 women take a microfinance loan and agree to pay a few hundred CFA as interest during the next meeting.
  4. As the bank gets larger, more women get to take a piece of the pot.  As more women take out loans the money increases.  As the money increases the women have more economic possibilities and freedom.  As they have more freedom, their families benefit, more creative solutions to daily problems arise and, overall, society moves forward.

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 17 – Faraba, Moringa GardenThe third section of Ballal is the Moringa Powder project, which is where we come in. The project came about during the last rainy season, but unfortunately this year the rains were very bad, so many of the trees planted this season died, leaving the Ballal team a bit defeated.

However, through Appropriate Projects funding, the group was able to get water to the trees by digging 2 wells and now with this pump and the next one installed for #18 the sky’s the limit for this project. Things are now moving along as planned and the goal to increase the availability of Moringa powder in health posts in the Kolda region looks like it will be reached.

We are proud to be able add our pumps as just one of the many innovations this wonderful group is using to engage and help the local populations of the Kolda region.

Pump Output: 41 Liters/ Min

Total Number of People Benefiting: 432

Funder: Cynthia J. Davidson

Filters for Life Program – Worldwide

Filters for Life Program – WorldwideWater Charity is proud to announce a new comprehensive program to provide much-needed water filters for people around the world. With new developments in filter technology, we can now provide needy communities with long-lasting, effective water filters that can provide 600 gallons of water a day... for a reasonable price.

We are very excited about this program, which will include individual projects all over the world. The need for these filters is great, and there is almost no limit to the number of wonderful new filters we can distribute as the funds become available.

Keep in mind:

  • 80% of all disease is water-borne
  • 50% of all hospital beds worldwide are occupied by someone suffering from a water-related illness
  • Lack of clean drinking water kills more people globally than all forms of violence combined... including war.

There is no need for these statistics to be true anymore. We have all the tools we need to completely eliminate this suffering and waste of life. The predominant victims of this terrible situation are young children. These kids deserve a chance.

As an addition to our current roster of successful programs in water and sanitation, which have included well drilling, rainwater catchment, toilet and handwashing station construction, emergency relief, reforestation efforts and more--including a good number of filter projects--as well as our acclaimed Appropriate Projects initiative, this new program will be an umbrella for our worldwide push to get these new filters into the hands of those people who desperately need them. It will include all relevant projects, large and small... thus enabling people to donate to the overall effort.

The projects in this program will be upwardly scalable, and as such, the more money we can raise, the more filters we can give out. Instead of creating and packaging the individual filter delivery projects one by one and funding them separately, it makes sense to raise as much money as possible and keep the filters flowing. In this way, we can also get larger grants from foundations and concerned organizations. We fully expect that this program will grow into the largest thing we have done.

For those interested in the filter technology we are presently proposing, please feel free to go to the Sawyer Saves Campaign website and peruse the relevant materials. We will be implementing primarily their Point One filter, but for hospitals, clinics and other sites we will also be making the Point Zero Two purifier available. [note: normally viruses are not a major issue for drinking water.]

This is an exciting program, and we hope you will see the need for it and join in. Water Charity is currently active in over 60 countries around the world. As the money comes in we will take the Filters for Life - Worldwide program into all of them and beyond.

If there are certain regions where you are especially interested in helping, it will be possible to donate specifically for those countries or areas. Just send us a message with your donation. However, we are hoping people will recognize that a general donation to the program itself will be the most effective way to get the maximum number of filters out in the shortest amount of time.

We are water... literally. The human body is about 70% water by mass, and a typical human cell is composed of 98.73% water molecules. Think about it.

El Pital and Las Tablas Spring Catchment Project – El Salvador

El Pital and Las Tablas Spring Catchment Project – El Salvador This project is build a new spring water catchment box and retaining wall to serve the communities of El Pital and Las Tablas.

The work will be implemented by El Pital ADESCO and Comite de Agua under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Jessica Henry.

Caserios El Pital and Las Tablas are home to about 700 people, and are located in Canton La Magdalena, Municipio Chalchuapa, Departamento Santa Ana, El Salvador.

The two communities share the same water source, an underground spring. They are growing quickly, and are eager to protect their main water source through preventative measures and community collaboration.

El Pital and Las Tablas Spring Catchment Project – El Salvador The area has an ADESCO and Cooperative Las Tablas. A recent community collaboration resulted in the repair of the access road to the communities. Two holding tanks for water were recently completed under the El Pital Spring Water Project – El Salvador.

The problem facing the communities is that due to the heavy rains and flooding that plagued El Salvador this past October, the area surrounding the natural underground spring suffered a great deal of erosion. This spring is the singular source of water for the aforementioned communities, and without a retaining wall and an improved main water capture box (the caja), the area around the spring is in great danger of collapsing and may dislodge the existing tanks that provide water for the communities.

The spring is embedded in the hillside, and if the earth around it collapses or is washed away in this year's rainy season it will devastate the community. The repairs achieved with Appropriate Projects funds will protect the natural environment and ensure that these growing communities continue to have access to safe drinking water.

A 15 ft by 5 ft tall retention wall will be built at the point of origin of the spring to prevent further erosion and the danger of the collapse and landslide of the earth surrounding the spring.

El Pital and Las Tablas Spring Catchment Project – El Salvador The aging leaking spring box, put in 35 years ago, will be completely replaced. The finished spring box will measure: 3 x 3 meters and 125 cm tall.

Project funds will be used to purchase materials, including cement, iron bars, sand, bricks, and wire. Also included will be delivery of materials and food for the lunches of the workers.

All labor will be donated by various community members called upon by the water committee. The committee will send out convocations, or invitations, the day before the donated day of labor, requesting the head of household to present himself for work, or pay $5 so the committee can pay another person to do an additional day of work.

The whole community is contributing to the project. The water committee also has a list of skilled construction workers, about 15 in the community, and at least one of those skilled workers will be present each day of construction.

To contribute for this project, please click on the Donate button below.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE. We are still soliciting donations for this project.

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Water Charity Honored

Water Charity Honored by Metropolitan Water District on World Water Day 2010

Water Charity was honored by the Metroplitan Water District and Friends of United Nations on World Water Day 2010 for our work in helping people obtain clean water worldwide.

WHO Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality

The Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality, third edition is now available as one integrated volume incorporating revisions reflected in the First and Second addenda.

http://bit.ly/2T08O

Quotations

Water is the only drink for a wise man.
Henry David Thoreau
US Transcendentalist author (1817 - 1862)