The mission of Water Charity is to implement immediate, efficient, and practical projects around the world to provide safe water and effective sanitation to those in need.


Conclusion of Amboromana Well Project - Madagascar

Conclusion of Amboromana Well Project - MadagascarThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Felicia Tobias. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project was to build 4 wells in the Amboromana district of Vohemar, Madagascar.

Felicia reports:

Clean, safe, water, or the lack thereof, is a problem in Vohemar. Most homes do not have running water. The people living here have to get their water from public taps, which often go dry. There are not enough on the main road, and none the farther you get from the center of town. There is often a long wait at these taps as well, with buckets piling up as people wait for water. As a result, people do not have enough water and will sometimes fetch it from dirty, dangerous sources.

I had been volunteering at a dispensary run by Sister Rosalie. A Malagasy nun from my region, she had travelled to the US and Canada before returning to her region to attend to the needs of her people.

This woman is amazing, she has a handle on every health, environment, and education challenge the people in this region face. From not enough water in a major town to a single child’s health problems in a small village, she knows it all.

Conclusion of Amboromana Well Project - MadagascarShe pulled me aside one day and informed me that the thing Vohemar needed that I could help provide would be wells. She worked out a budget, obtaining quotes from local vendors, and the project was underway.

It took a few months longer than anticipated, which means things went very fast by Madagascar standards, but the project was completed.

I had missed the inauguration of Wells 1 and 3 and ended up just travelling to them to take photos once I returned, but I made sure to be in town for 2 and 4.

I didn’t know what to expect, so I was pleasantly surprised to find the Mayor in attendance. The event at each well was long, but the ceremony part of it was very brief. The Mayor thanked both me and Sister Rosalie for our help in the community. He said the wells would be Vohemar’s “souvenirs” of my stay here when I returned to the United States. I gave the key to the well to a key community member and that was the ceremony.

Then the mayor gave a long talk on the importance of proper maintenance and clean drinking water. He stressed that the well was the responsibility of those living around it. He encouraged them to keep it clean to keep the area free of grass and debris, explaining that this could attract cows and other animals which would defecate and potentially dirty the water source. He explained the importance of closing the well when it was not in use and of locking it at night to ensure that nothing found its way in there. He explained that dirty water could lead to cholera, dysentery or any number of diseases which require expensive medication to cure, so it was better to take preventative measures.

I feel very lucky. Not only do I have awesome people back in the United States, but I have a great community here as well.

We are grateful to Felicia for completing this outstanding project, and again wish to thank The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative and Positive H2O (+H2O) for providing the funding.

Conclusion of Amboromana Well Project - MadagascarConclusion of Amboromana Well Project - Madagascar
Conclusion of Amboromana Well Project - MadagascarConclusion of Amboromana Well Project - Madagascar
Conclusion of Amboromana Well Project - MadagascarConclusion of Amboromana Well Project - Madagascar
Conclusion of Amboromana Well Project - MadagascarConclusion of Amboromana Well Project - Madagascar

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 16 - Daro Keur Ibrahima Signane, Community Garden

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 16 - Daro Keur Ibrahima Signane, Community GardenThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd, Garrison Harward, and Amy Watts. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

Marcie reports:

With the conclusion of this second pump in the space, there is now adequate water readily available to properly irrigate the community garden.

In the morning the young boys of the town come to water before heading off to school. The real times to come down the hill though are for the evening watering sessions which are a social event in DKIS and many women shower and put on nice clothes before kicking off their flip-flops and filling their watering cans.

There are two main community leaders in Daro Keur Ibrahima Signane (DKIS) to whom Peace Corps Volunteer Amy Watts attributes DKIS’s success. Baboucar Boussou and Cheikh Dione genuinely want to see their village succeed and have worked hard to make sure it happens.

Baboucar Boussou is hard working, cleaver, innovative, and a dependable peace-maker in times of community division. He is the community leader for all things food-related in DKIS including the school lunch program and directing the women’s garden. Baboucar does a role reversal taking on the director position of the women’s garden as that is traditionally a woman’s job. He handles everything from the division of plots to materials and does it with ease while also working on his field crops and working with other organizations such as Wula Nafaa.

Cheikh Dione is the full time director of the primary school, a part-time farmer, and he and Baboucar are stuck at the hip. Cheikh speaks English, Arabic, French, and Wolof, is super bright, always smiling and only 33 years old. Cheikh is a staple at the community garden and one can often find him wandering around helping the women water.

Peace Corps has been working in DKIS for the last 5 years but the women’s garden was established only 3 years ago. It has come a long way, as every single plot is filled and more is produced each year!

Pump Output: 37 Liters/ Min

Total Number of People Benefiting: 78 families

Funder: Jacqueline Chan in honor of Heather Chan

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 16 - Daro Keur Ibrahima Signane, Community GardenConclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 16 - Daro Keur Ibrahima Signane, Community Garden

Pempe Rainwater Catchment Project – Suriname

Pempe Rainwater Catchment Project – SurinameThis project is to install 43 rainwater catchment systems to provide clean drinking water for the residents of the village of Pempe.

The project is being implemented under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Erica D’Aquila. She is living on the Upper Suriname River located in the district Sipaliwini, in the Saramaccan village Pempe (also known as Pingpe/Pen Pen).

Pempe has approximately 140 inhabitants, who all live off the land. Everything from their cooking oil, rice, vegetables, and housing materials come directly from Pempe’s surroundings.

Pempe Rainwater Catchment Project – SurinameRecent tests of Pempe’s drinking water (a local creek) have shown the water to be infested by various strains of E-coli and other hazardous bacteria. The effects of these contaminants is displayed by the fact that community members often suffer from waterborne illnesses, leaving adults unable to travel to their farms to harvest food and children vulnerable to the dangerous side effects of malnutrition.

The objective of this project is to bring clean drinking water to the men, women, and children of Pempe in a way that is sustainable by the community and available year round. The project centers around the acquisition of DuroTanks, which are large, round, covered tanks for the storage of 400 gallons of rainwater. These tanks are popular in the region, inexpensive, easy to maintain, and sustainable, lasting up to 25 years.

The community has committed to contribute a cash amount for each DuroTank, and provide all labor necessary. Labor includes transporting supplies to the village from Paramaribo, manually pulling sand from the bottom of the riverbed, making of cement stones, and setting up the gutters, stands, and netting.

Pempe Rainwater Catchment Project – SurinameCommunity members will participate in a three week training regarding DuroTank installation, maintenance, and water conservation classes. This training will result in community members being able to provide maintenance on the DuroTanks and ensuring their longevity.

The Water Charity involvement in this project has been funded, through the generosity of the SLOW LIFE Foundation as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

Any additional donations using the Donate button below will be used to fund other projects by this PCV and/or those of other PCVs in the host country.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 16 - Daro Keur Ibrahima Signane, Community Garden

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 16 - Daro Keur Ibrahima Signane, Community GardenThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Daro Keur Ibrahima Signane, Fatick, Senegal

Community Description
This project is being implemented in the community of Daro Keur Ibrahima Signane, which was described in Project 15.

Pump number 16 completes the 5 pumps in 5 days series. Darou Keur Ibrahima Signane (DKIS for short) is a true community space. Within the hectare are 83 plots owned by 78 families, as almost each family in DKIS gardens. Most of the garden is used to produce for the village while 10 percent of the garden space is marked off for market gardening and selling at DKIS local market.

Each day of the week in roadside towns across Senegal is a local market called a luumo. Luumo is where many people in villages go to buy their produce for the week as well as other essentials such as clothes, furniture, and rope. Luumos carry a lot of the products to the village that can only be found in bigger cities. This saves villagers from having to travel to a city. Also, the luumo gives producers access to a market close to home to sell their products. At the luumo DKIS sells hot peppers and green peppers.

Project Description
The pump being installed here will be the second in this space, the first having been described under Project 15.

Project Impact
78 families will benefit from this project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Garrison Harward, Marcie Todd, and Amy Watts

Comments
This project further proves the benefit of scale achieved from working on double pumps and pumps in a concentrated geographical area.

Dollar Amount of Project
$100.00

Donations Collected to Date
$100.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Jacqueline Chan, of Crestline, CA, USA in honor of Heather Chan, of Uxbridge, Ontario, Canada.

If you now contribute $150 (our new price, which includes labor), your name will be placed on the waiting list to adopt the next project in order.

If you wish to contribute less than $150, the money will be applied toward the overall program.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 16 - Daro Keur Ibrahima Signane, Community Garden52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 16 - Daro Keur Ibrahima Signane, Community Garden

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 13 - Dassilame Serere Eco Campament Pump Expansion Project

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 13 - Dassilame Serere Eco Campament Pump Expansion ProjectThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

Marcie and Garrison report:

As we said before this is the second pump we’ve partnered with Pape on and as such the work was pretty straightforward. Pape picked up the supplies for us and Garrison cast the cap the week before, so on the actual install day we only had to lift the cap, and install the piping.

We got there early and did precisely that… lucky number thirteen turned out to be pretty lucky indeed. No problems, no adventures, not even any stories really. Development work as an adventure with difficult struggles and beautiful cultural exchanges is certainly interesting, but sometimes there is just a need to be filled and the job gets done and that’s it. Not all that interesting but pretty effective.

Our most interesting part of this install was actually watching how all the tourists interacted with it. They watched us fascinated and then played with the pump afterwards. In the west we love toys, and to some extent water pumps are like toys, which is probably why so many of them get installed even if the particular model isn’t appropriate or very effective. Technology isn’t always better than manual labor. That said this pump IS better and much more efficient then pulling by hand at an appropriate depth. Dassilame Serere has a wonderfully shallow water table, which makes this particular pump very worthwhile.

Pape and Garrison are also now working on a project which will take this increased efficiency and magnify it by using the pumps to help distribute water to 6 basins spread throughout the field. Once complete no woman will have a plot more then 15-20 meters away from a water source. Previously they may have had to carry water upwards of 50 meters, a difficult feat when watering an entire garden.

Pump Output: 30 Liters/ Min

Total Number of People Benefiting: 64

Funder: Caroline Fahmy

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 13 - Dassilame Serere Eco Campament Pump Expansion ProjectConclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 13 - Dassilame Serere Eco Campament Pump Expansion Project

Sya Bright Future Primary School Water Tank Project - Uganda

Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks Water Tank Program – UgandaThis is the first project to be implemented under the Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks Water Tank Program – Uganda. A large-capacity water tank will be built to serve the needs of the Sya Bright Future Primary School.

Omungari Parish, located in Kiruhura District, is a rural community located in the “dry cattle corridor” of southwestern Uganda. Located 22 kilometers from the nearest paved roads, the people who call Omungari home are mainly of the Banyankole and Bahima tribes. They are generally farmers and cattle herders who grow mainly bananas, maize, and cassava for subsistence, and coffee as the main cash crop.

Omungari is a growing community, most notably seen in the last two years through the arrival of two public service institutions. The presence of Life Child Initiative (LICHI), a privately run health center, and Omungari Secondary School, has spurred an increase in residential construction throughout the trading center and surrounding areas.

Despite the increase in activity seen for Omungari, many problems loom large for living healthy lifestyles. Alcohol consumption is high, income is very low, theft is prevalent, and literacy levels are low, to name but a few.

In addition to the aforementioned, two aspects of life in Omungari stand out as major obstacles to improving the quality of life for the people. Access to clean water sources throughout the area and limited resources within the school systems are serious issues that need to be addressed.

Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks Water Tank Program – UgandaThe Sya Bright Future Primary School is, like the health center, a privately run institution, in contrast to the more prevalent government sponsored schools. Catering to students from nursery level to primary seven, there are currently 17 staff members and nearly 400 students, about half of whom are boarding and half day students.

As with nearly every school in the area, Sya Bright Future has a major challenge in meeting its own need for clean water in order to cook, wash clothes, bathe, and drink. Currently, water is taken from a nearby pond that is filled by groundwater runoff from the fairly large watershed area surrounding the school. This is very poor quality water and leads to a host of hygiene and sanitation-related problems for staff and students alike.

Under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Jesse Coker, who presently works at LICHI, a water tank will be built at the school through the use of Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks (ISSB), as explained on the program page for the Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks Water Tank Program – Uganda.

The school has several large buildings with excellent iron sheet roofs that are ideal for the harvesting of clean rainwater for all of its water needs. A 20,000-liter water tank will be positioned just downslope from the new large dormitory, which is just upslope from the bathing area and also just upslope from the kitchen. This way, the least effort is needed to transport the water for multiple uses throughout the schools compound.

The money supplied by Appropriate Projects will cover roughly half of the costs of this project. The rest will be covered by Sya Bright Future Primary School.

The use of the ISSB technology will assist in the development of a new business that is aimed at helping LICHI transition from external funding sources to a more local, sustainable, and community-oriented approach to health care provision. The construction of this water tank at Sya Bright Future Primary School will help to achieve significant results at two levels: meeting the water needs at the school, and helping to establish a business that will support the activities of a rural health center and thus the health of a population in need.

As an added incentive for potential clients, Engari Community Health Centre is offering complimentary health talks in hygiene and sanitation for every tank that is constructed.

To indicate your desire for your contribution to be allocated toward the overall Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks Water Tank Program – Uganda, please click the Donate button below.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks Water Tank Program – Uganda

Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks Water Tank Program – UgandaThis is a program to develop the capacity to build water storage tanks throughout Uganda using the Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks (ISSB) technology. It is being implemented under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Jesse Coker.

The program consists of promoting the technology by implementing a training and production system. It is designed to address critical water needs in Uganda, and also create a viable economic opportunity for local residents. It will lead to the availability of more water, a system of better practices, and a higher level of health care for the people of Kiruhura District and beyond.

The ISSB method and technology has existed in Uganda for twenty years. A former PCV gave Jesse the inspiration to explore this methodology. Currently, there are at least four other volunteers in Uganda whose host organizations are involved with this technique of brick making for the construction of rainwater harvesting tanks. The cost for building these tanks is less than that of other methods currently being used locally.

Under the ISSB method, the bricks are made at the site where a tank is being built, eliminating transport costs and the subsequently damaged bricks. Bricks are made through a manual compression machine, which requires neither electricity nor fuel to operate.

A simple mixture of subsoil, water, and between five and ten percent cement is compressed, and the resulting brick needs to cure for two days before it can be used. This is in stark contrast to the firing process that requires vast amounts of firewood and about three months’ time to make bricks, which are also of a lesser quality.

The bricks that are produced by the ISSB methodology are weatherproof and do not require firing. They are interlocking on four sides and are curved in order to easily build a range of water tank sizes between 5,000 and 25,000 liters.

Because of the interlocking nature of these bricks, only five millimeters of cement needs to be used between courses of bricks. Courses are built on top of a stone and cement foundation, with diameter and height determined by tank volume.

Depending on the capacity of the tank being built, structural reinforcements are added, such as rebar between every third course of bricks for a 20,000-liter tank. A metal support pipe is added to the inside of the tank to support the cement roof that is built.

To complete the system, gutters are added to the adjacent building for harvesting the rainfall that is received during one of two rainy seasons. The resulting process is cost-effective, durable, and environmentally friendly, and helps the local economy.

Jesse currently work at Life Child Initiative (LICHI), a privately run Health Centre, in Omungari Parish, located in Kiruhura, Uganda. Jesse and his local counterpart, James Betungura, have already trained a group of local men to operate the brickmaking machine and build water tanks.

The team is presently in a stage of marketing throughout the community, visiting other health centers, schools, churches, businesses, and some private households.

As the program grows, the ability to build larger capacity water storage tanks (30,000 to 100,000-liters) will be developed.

Continuity and sustainability will be achieved when Jesse is replaced after conclusion of his Peace Corps service in October.

The first project be built under this program was the Sya Bright Future Primary School Water Tank Project - Uganda.

The second project be built under this program was the Kanoni Water Tank Project - Uganda.

To indicate your desire for your contribution to be allocated toward this program, please click the Donate button below.

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 15 - Daro Keur Ibrahima Signane

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 15 - Daro Keur Ibrahima SignaneThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

Marcie and Garrison report:

This pump has been a long time in the making. We initially did the village meetings before the rainy season, prepped the well cap during the rainy season, and finished the install after, and now finally we're writing everything up. There really are a lot of steps that go into installing a pump.

This pump was a part of our 5 pump tour so luckily both of us got to be here for the install. Amy Watts, the volunteer in Daro, helped Garrison do the prep work on the well cap and Marcie came out for the Install. As is the norm in Senegal though, things didn't go exactly according to plan.

The day that we decided to cast the well cap turned out to be the same day as the last rain of the rainy season. It was quite a torrent. At first we thought maybe we could just ride it out under a tree, but the rain just kept getting heavier and heavier. We decided to make a run for it and just in time.

As soon as we got back to Amy's hut the lighting started striking much too close for comfort. Half an hour of hunkering down though and the storm had passed and we were ready to finish the cap.

When Marcie arrived we had our second big hang up. The village wasn't able to find the right PVC pipe so we had to spend all morning searching in Toubacouta and in the end splicing together several pipes to get the full length. We didn't even start the install until after lunch and needless to say it was hot. Morning really is a much more preferable time to work here.

In the end though we went through the routine, hooked everything up and exchanged high fives and hugs when the water started flowing. The problems were minor compared with the benefits. The village was thrilled and is talking about the possibility of expanding their garden and investing in a basin system. We'll keep you updated as things progress.

Pump Output: 37 Liters/ Min

Total Number of People Benefiting: 75

Funder: Jacqueline Chan in honor of Steve Cockwell

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 15 - Daro Keur Ibrahima SignaneConclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 15 - Daro Keur Ibrahima Signane

Kunahandhoo Island Rainwater Harvesting Project – Maldives

Kunahandhoo Island Rainwater Harvesting Project – Maldives This is the first project to be implemented under the Rainwater Harvesting Program – Maldives.

Within the community of Kunahandhoo, 4 currently unconnected rainwater tanks, received as a part of a governmental aid program, are sitting unused because the community lacks the resources to develop them into a working system to help meet the freshwater needs of the island.

The four tanks consist of one of 10,000-liter capacity, one of 5,000-liter capacity and two of 2,500-liter capacity. Under the project, the four tanks will be connected to comprise a workable system using the appropriate piping and fixtures.

An optimal site, located between the community harbor and the island’s residential area, has been allocated. A concrete platform will be built and the tanks will be secured. A catchment area will be built over the tanks to house and shade them. Finally, gutters and piping will be installed to capture the rainwater and direct it by gravity into the tanks for storage.

The planning has been completed, and work is underway to purchase the materials and contract the labor for installation. We will keep you updated as the project progresses.

This project has been fully funded by the SLOW LIFE Foundation and Positive H2O. If you wish to contribute to the expansion of the Rainwater Harvesting Program – Maldives to other islands, please click on the Donate button below.

Kunahandhoo Island Rainwater Harvesting Project – MaldivesKunahandhoo Island Rainwater Harvesting Project – Maldives

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 15 - Daro Keur Ibrahima Signane

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 15 - Daro Keur Ibrahima SignaneThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Daro Keur Ibrahima Signane, Fatick, Senegal

Community Description
Daro is located just off the laterite road going from Toubacouta to Saloum Diane. We first started looking into this village after the Keur Andallah pump when we literally stopped in on the bike ride home. As soon as we did and saw their broken down water pump, we knew Daro had to be part of the project.

The village is small, only about 300 people, and predominately Wolof, but like everywhere in this region there are a few Mandinkans, Sereres and Pulaars. There is a primary school which almost all the children attend and a substantial community garden established by a previous Peace Corps Volunteer. It is primarily an agricultural village and the people here are already excellent gardeners and farmers. They have had a wonderful relationship with Peace Corps over the years and are continually learning and expanding their efforts.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 15 - Daro Keur Ibrahima SignaneProject Description
The community garden provides 75 people with fenced in plots for vegetable production. It sits within a flood basin which means that the water table is very high and perfect for rope pumps. There are two wells in this space and thus we will be installing two rope pumps. Pump #16 will be the second in this space.

Project Impact
All 75 members of the group will benefit from increased access to water. This should lead to increased production which will then increase overall nutrition in the village for kids like these.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Garrison Harward, Marcie Todd, and Amy Watts

Comments
These pumps will decrease crowding around the well and speed up the process of watering, allowing more time to be devoted to trying new gardening techniques and increasing yields.

This is the first of two pumps in this space. We're going to be trying to do more double installs like this in order to fully meet the needs of our villages.

Dollar Amount of Project
$100.00

Donations Collected to Date
$100.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Jacqueline Chan, of Crestline, CA, USA in honor of Steve Cockwell, of Uxbridge, Ontario, Canada.

If you now contribute $150 (our new price, which includes labor), your name will be placed on the waiting list to adopt the next project in order.

If you wish to contribute less than $150, the money will be applied toward the overall program.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.




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Water Charity
P.O. Box 368
Crestline, CA 92325

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Water Charity Honored

Water Charity Honored by Metropolitan Water District on World Water Day 2010

Water Charity was honored by the Metroplitan Water District and Friends of United Nations on World Water Day 2010 for our work in helping people obtain clean water worldwide.

WHO Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality

The Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality, third edition is now available as one integrated volume incorporating revisions reflected in the First and Second addenda.

http://bit.ly/2T08O

Quotations

Water is the only drink for a wise man.
Henry David Thoreau
US Transcendentalist author (1817 - 1862)