The mission of Water Charity is to implement immediate, efficient, and practical projects around the world to provide safe water and effective sanitation to those in need.


Conclusion of El Jícaro Concrete Floors in Homes Project – Guatemala

Conclusion of El Jícaro Concrete Floors in Homes Project – GuatemalaThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Lauren Truxillo. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to construct concrete floors in up to 64 homes.

Lauren reports on the project, which was concluded earlier this year:

The first family in El Jícaro constructed their floor on March 18, 2011 and the final floor was finished on April 30, 2011. There are now 53 nice, smooth cement floors where before there was dirt, dust, and mud (52 floors in homes plus one floor in the community church kitchen).

Each family was responsible for carrying their materials from the main road to their homes, often in feed sacks on their backs, supported with a head strap. Additionally the families hired their own masons (often neighbors and project beneficiaries themselves) to build the floors.

Conclusion of El Jícaro Concrete Floors in Homes Project – GuatemalaProject funds were used exclusively to purchase cement, gravel, sand, and paint for the floors. The project was inaugurated May 24, 2011 with a thanksgiving mass in the community church where the community expressed their gratitude for the project.

In the workshops the health promoters stressed to project beneficiaries that a floor alone will not do much to improve family health if the families do not eat well, bathe regularly, drink safe water, or wash their hands often. The floors are built, and that is definitely a change. But I also hope that the participants, by putting everything they have learned in practice, will have healthier, more productive lives that enable them to leave the cycle of poverty.

I hope the health promoters will continue to promote health. But at the very least, the living conditions have improved for 52 families who will live with a little more dignity than before.

At this time, I would like to extend my thanks to Water Charity for supporting the El Jícaro Floors Project.

Conclusion of El Jícaro Concrete Floors in Homes Project – GuatemalaConclusion of El Jícaro Concrete Floors in Homes Project – Guatemala
Conclusion of El Jícaro Concrete Floors in Homes Project – GuatemalaConclusion of El Jícaro Concrete Floors in Homes Project – Guatemala

Presenting Water Charity

Our fundraising event was a spectacular success! The Water/Wo/Men event took place in Laamu, Maldives, from September 30 through October 4, and attracted the world’s leading watersports icons and water conservationists, together with actors, artists, and musicians.

As a part of the week’s activities, a video was made by our hosts, Six Senses Resorts and Spas, to highlight the work that Water Charity is doing.

We came out of the week of conferences and activities with a plan to publicize the need to provide clean water for the world, and attack the problem by continuing to do projects as fast as we can using our demonstrated successful model.

Six Senses has been our reliable and generous partner for several years. To step up the game, Water Charity is seeking the assistance of other environmentally- and socially- conscious companies to expand our efforts.

Enjoy the video, and let us know what you think.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 11 - Thiawando

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 11 - ThiawandoThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Thiawando, Kaolack, Senegal

Community Description
Thiawando is a far cry from the remoteness of Keur Andallah, as it is located just 10 k outside of the regional capital, but amazingly it still has many of the same issues. It is a fairly large community of over 800 people, mostly peanut and millet farmers, but has only two wells with potable water. Of these two almost everyone in the village uses just one, because it is closer and the water slightly cleaner.

Here we have one of the classic problems that the Senegalese face: just 10k away in Kaolack there is electricity and running water but as soon as you leave the city center there just isn¹t the infrastructure or money to continue these amenities to surrounding villages.

Far from a sob story though, this village is thriving. It is a multicultural hub, as many villages in this region are, where almost everyone speaks three languages if not more. Also many people have jobs in the capital since it is so close, and as a result the village is obviously somewhat more prosperous than most.

The Mosque is beautiful and there is a large storage building for saving the community’s yearly harvest. Really the only thing holding them back is a lack of access to water.

Project Description
We will be installing a rope pump on the main community well from which most of the 800 residents drink. This should ease congestion around the well as it speeds up the process of pulling water.

In addition to this the village has expressed interest in starting a community garden next to the well. With the market being so close this will be a great small business opportunity and will help to increase overall nutrition in the village.

Project Impact
All 800 residents will benefit from the project through either increased speed pulling water, or increased financial security and nutrition from the garden.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Garrison Harward and C.J. Pedersen

Comments
This is a high-impact project that will extend great benefit to the community at minimal cost.

Dollar Amount of Project
$100.00

Donations Collected to Date
$100.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Susan Smith of Rockville, MD, USA.

If you now contribute $100, your name will be placed on the waiting list to adopt the next project in order.

If you wish to contribute less than $100, the money will be applied toward the overall program.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of Sanitary Bathrooms Project – Paraguay

This project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Michelle Pfister. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

Water Charity participated in this project to provide sanitary bathrooms for 21 families, or 120 people.

Michelle reports: The pictures below show typical finished bathrooms.

Project funds were used to purchase the materials and pay for professional labor for the construction of the bathroom structures and the installation of the fixtures.

The participants learned many skills, including project design and management, community organization, planning, administrative and financial practices, understanding of governmental and NGO processes, improved hygiene and sanitation habits, and construction techniques.

Since the completion of the bathroom project, families have reported fewer parasite-related illnesses. This project will benefit the people of the community for many years to come.

We again wish to thank Six Senses Resorts & Spas for providing the funding for the Water Charity participation in this project.

Conclusion of Sanitary Bathrooms Project – ParaguayConclusion of Sanitary Bathrooms Project – Paraguay

Conclusion of Epako Rainwater Harvesting Project – Namibia

Conclusion of Epako Rainwater Harvesting Project – NamibiaThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Amanda Miller. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project was to build a rain water harvesting system for the Early Intervention Programme (EIP) Community Garden.

Amanda reports:

EIP Founder Ben Motlata and I worked together to get quotes for the materials and secure the materials from local businesses. The people at Bargain Builders in Gobabis were especially helpful and even gave us a discount when I told them the scope of the project.

Ben was very resourceful and helped me to find the best materials for the right price. The garden project is something very close to his heart.

The community was very interested in the work we were doing. Children and people passing by would ask Ben why he had such large containers in his yard and what he planned to do with them.

One youth, Benny, told another kid on the street that they were going to gather water and save money. Benny was an active participant in the garden project. Although Benny was struggling with food and a safe place to sleep, I would see him in the mornings at the garden watering and weeding. Alfonse was another very active and appreciative teenager. He worked hard at the garden and helped Ben and I construct a large compost pile.

When I completed my service as a Peace Corps Volunteer, another PCV helped Ben with the finishing touches of installing the rain gutters. Ben used the rain water collection system to water his garden for nearly five months, helping him get through the dry season.

Amanda provides follow-up information:

About ten months after the rain water collection tanks were erected and the rain gutters installed, Ben was robbed, and he was forced to move his garden into town for the safety of his family and the youth living on the streets that he works with.

Ben moved the rain water collection system to a new plot of land where he continues to farm his crops. The system has helped Ben to cut down on costs of growing food for himself, his family, and the youth (living on the streets) he works with. He struggles to use the water sparingly during the dry season due to all of the demands for water, but the project remains a model that others can replicate.

We are grateful to Amanda for completing this project, and wish her the best in her career.

Conclusion of Future Garden School Water Project – Thailand

Conclusion of Future Garden School Water Project – Thailand This project has been completed under the direction of Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Mark Cox. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to bring a water supply to the Future Garden School.

Mark reports:

Future Garden School has finished their water project!

It took approximately four days to complete. The Thai village headman assisted by allowing the school to connect to his water source, as well as finding laborers to do the work.

The water connection is about 200 meters away from the school and about 50 meters uphill, which eliminates the need for a pump through the use of gravity.

Thank you again for your kindness in providing the funds.

The school now has a safe clean water supply for drinking, cooking, cleaning, sanitation, and gardening. We are grateful to Mark for overseeing the project, and again extend our thanks to The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust for providing the funding.

Conclusion of Future Garden School Water Project – ThailandConclusion of Future Garden School Water Project – Thailand
Conclusion of Future Garden School Water Project – ThailandConclusion of Future Garden School Water Project – Thailand
Conclusion of Future Garden School Water Project – ThailandConclusion of Future Garden School Water Project – Thailand

Conclusion of Latrine Construction Training Project – Dominican Republic

Conclusion of Latrine Construction Training Project – Dominican RepublicThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer E. Monteith. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project was part of a larger effort to build 15 to 20 latrines, and conduct a construction, maintenance, and hygiene training program as part of the process.

In total, 18 latrines were built. Project funds were used to purchase cement, sand, gravel, zinc, wood, nails, hinges, PVC, and rebar.

All of the owners and families learned proper latrine placement to protect the water supply. They helped each other to build the latrines, and were all committed to maintaining them into the future.

The families came to 3 meetings pertaining to general latrine maintenance and hygiene as part of the program.

In all, about 100 people directly benefitted from the project from improved health and wellbeing.

Water Charity is Going on the Road

Beach at Laamu, MaldivesWe have finalized a very exciting travel itinerary that will take us to New York, Washington, D.C, Sri Lanka, Maldives, and India. It will keep us on the road from Mid-September through mid-October, 2011. I’ll briefly describe where we’re going, and report back later as these events unfold.

On September 16, we will participate in the International Water Forum at the United Nations. This event, spearheaded by the Chronicles Group, is billed as a convocation of world leaders, academics, NGOs, and private sector representatives to take the first step toward organizing a worldwide education and awareness campaign on the global water crisis. Held concurrently with the opening of the 66th Session of the United States General Assembly, there will be panels and work sessions aimed at developing a comprehensive plan that will lead us into the future.

In Washington, D.C., we will participate in events celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Peace Corps. Organized by the National Peace Corps Association, over a jam-packed period of 5 days we will be trained in advocacy (on the Peace Corps message as well as other environmental and social issues facing the world today), knock on the doors of our Senators and Congressmen, socialize with members of various country groups, study the issues unique to individual countries, meet with luminaries (ranging from media stars to presidents of countries), and give ourselves a well-deserved pat on the back for 50 years of service by over 200,000+ volunteers in 139 countries.

We will then move on to Sri Lanka, where we will meet with a number of NGOs to hammer out projects for implementation. True to Water Charity’s “do it now” approach, these new projects will be rolled out by the end of the year.

The centerpiece of or trip will be the Six Senses Water/Wo/Men Event at Laamu, Maldives, September 30 through October 4, 2011. This extravaganza is to raise money for Water Charity and two other world-class charitable organizations. It will feature a star-studded field of watermen, including surfers, windsurfers, kitesurfers, divers, and free divers. It will be a coming together of famous environmentalists and conservationist, and will feature lively discussions and work sessions.

During the event, we will travel to an adjoining island to work hands on to build rainwater catchment and storage systems for villagers on a nearby island.

We will then move on to Mumbai, our first stop in India. We will meet with several local NGOs, in an effort to line up new projects to commence early next year.

Our final stop in India will be Ahmedabad. We will have the opportunity to wrap up and evaluate the Javavandh Rainwater Harvesting Project and Mansangh Vandh Well Project which we recently implemented as our first project in the country. We will expand upon and replicate our successes.

We’ll be back in California in mid-October. Our connectivity and working time will be limited until then, so we apologize in advance if it seems that regular Water Charity business has slowed down to a snail’s pace. We’ll be all caught up by the end of the year, and will look forward to a great 2012, building upon our amazing successes of this year.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 10 - Saare Gouna, Community Garden

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 10 - Saare Gouna, Community GardenThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Saare Gouna, Senegal

Community Description
Saare Gouna is the third and final village in the clump of villages near Saare SambaThika.

Saare Gouna’s community garden is the best organized garden I have seen yet. There are 29 women who work in the garden and each one has her own space, divided by hundreds of tree branches sown together with prickly bush.

Each woman’s plot is a half a chord, though some of the older women have a bit more space, and they grow the veggies of their choosing.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 10 - Saare Gouna, Community GardenAlmost every woman grows hibiscus, whose leaves are harvested for sauce and flowers for juice, and okra. The combination is like the tomato basil duo we Americans grow in our back yards.

Project Description
Saare Gouna has one-well maintained and clean well located in the middle of their space. Each of the women pull about 20 buckets of water minimum for their gardens which becomes very tiresome, and a pump will speed along the process greatly while also saving energy.

Project Impact
The 29 members of the garden will directly benefit from the pump. Indirectly, all of their families will benefit as well.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Marcie Todd

Comments
This is another great project to add to the string of successes. The benefit to the women and their families will be long lasting.

Dollar Amount of Project
$100.00

Donations Collected to Date
$100.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Cynthia Sperry, of Fayetteville, NC, USA.

If you now contribute $100, your name will be placed on the waiting list to adopt the next project in order.

If you wish to contribute less than $100, the money will be applied toward the overall program.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of Women’s Community Center Project – Paraguay

Conclusion of Women’s Community Center Project – ParaguayThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Matthew Lebon. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to complete the water and sanitation portions of a community effort to build a women’s community center in this rural community in Paraguay.

The project resulted in the construction of a facility with a kitchen, bathroom, electricity, running water, and necessary supplies for the women to use to develop business opportunities, including a bakery.

The Water Charity contribution specifically allowed for water to be provided in the kitchen for drinking, cooking, and cleaning, and in the bathroom, for sanitary and hygiene purposes.

The project served as an educational experience for the women's group, and its successful conclusion added to their confidence to be able to proceed to develop new economic endeavors.

Approximately 100 people directly benefited from this project. Hundreds more, including the families of the participating women, will indirectly benefit from the revenue-gaining ventures in which the women will now be able to participate.

We extend our thanks to Matthew for successfully completing this project.

We again wish to thank The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust for providing the funding for this project.




We are a 501(c)(3) public charity. If you like the work we are doing, we invite you to make a tax-exempt general donation of any amount.

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If you prefer, you can send a check to:

Water Charity
P.O. Box 368
Crestline, CA 92325

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Water Charity Honored

Water Charity Honored by Metropolitan Water District on World Water Day 2010

Water Charity was honored by the Metroplitan Water District and Friends of United Nations on World Water Day 2010 for our work in helping people obtain clean water worldwide.

WHO Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality

The Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality, third edition is now available as one integrated volume incorporating revisions reflected in the First and Second addenda.

http://bit.ly/2T08O

Quotations

Water is the only drink for a wise man.
Henry David Thoreau
US Transcendentalist author (1817 - 1862)