The mission of Water Charity is to implement immediate, efficient, and practical projects around the world to provide safe water and effective sanitation to those in need.


Conclusion of Community Garden for People Living With HIV – Botswana

Conclusion of Community Garden for People Living With HIV – BotswanaThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Alexandria Price. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project was to provide for the irrigation of the garden, a tank for the collection of rainwater, piping, and fixtures, as part of a project for the implementation of a vegetable garden for People Living with HIV.

Alexandria reports:

After receiving the funding, we immediately started implementing our priority goals of erecting the fence and purchasing necessary tools to cultivate the garden. I was impressed by the group's enthusiasm and dedication to the project and the possibilities seemed endless.

Conclusion of Community Garden for People Living With HIV – BotswanaA series of problems arose during which it appeared that we would be unable to meet our objective of having a water source at the garden. There was a severe water shortage in the village of Rakops due to below average rainfall and a malfunction at the local boreholes. Due to miscommunications, the Department of Water Affairs did not install our water tap.

We tried to carry and wheelbarrow water to the site and this led to a small amount of vegetables actually growing. We found it to be impossible to continue this task, as some villagers did not have access to water at their personal homes due to a breakdown of the local water system.

We decided to postpone the project until water would be available, but this did not happen until after planting season had ended.

Finally, the day I left my village the Department of Water Affairs FINALLY installed a private tap for the garden!!!! This will greatly add to the productivity and sustainability of the garden.

The new Peace Corps Volunteer and I are still in contact about the project and how to move it forward with the new water supply and storage tank in place.

We again thank The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust for providing the funding for the Water Charity participation in this project.

Conclusion of Community Garden for People Living With HIV – BotswanaConclusion of Community Garden for People Living With HIV – Botswana
Conclusion of Community Garden for People Living With HIV – BotswanaConclusion of Community Garden for People Living With HIV – Botswana
Conclusion of Community Garden for People Living With HIV – BotswanaConclusion of Community Garden for People Living With HIV – Botswana

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 6 - Saare Asset

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 6 - Saare AssetThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Saare Asset, Kolda, Senegal

Community Description
Asset means Saturday in Pulaar. We asked if the village was created on a Saturday, but only got laughs. Saare Asset is the second pump site in the cluster of small villages surrounding Saare Samba Thika. Saare Asset is slightly larger than the others with a total of 152 community members.

The 68 women of this village work on a 2 hectare community garden where they grow immaculate okra, hibiscus, and hot peppers. They spend the early morning hours watering their garden, come home to cook lunch and then start the watering process all over again.

Saare Asset and Saare Samba Thika are within walking distance from each other and in many ways a part of the same big family. The two villages intermarry, adopt each other’s farming and cow raising techniques and sometimes even have community meetings together. Though they seem similar in many ways the culture of Saare Asset is slightly different.

Saare Asset has a good number of boys who go into Kolda to study during the year, come back to work for summer break and to be with their families for Ramadan. This, among other things, seems to make community motivation slightly stronger.

Project Description
Saare Asset is genius when it comes to using their resources. They have two pulley systems set up that have a bucket attached to each end of the rope. When they are emptying one bucket, simultaneously the second bucket is filling; this cuts the onerous task of pulling water in half. Saare Asset is on the horizon of expanding their garden. They have almost saved enough money to expand their fence an extra hectare and with that in mind the hand pump will help save a lot of time.

Project Impact
The 68 members of the community garden and their families will benefit from the pump.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Marcie Todd

Comments
The replication of the process in neighboring villages is valuable for the proliferation of the technology and will lead to sustainability.

Dollar Amount of Project
$100.00

Donations Collected to Date
$100.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Harrison Walls, of Santa Cruz, CA, USA.

If you now contribute $100, your name will be placed on the waiting list to adopt the next project in order.

If you wish to contribute less than $100, the money will be applied toward the overall program.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 6 - Saare Asset52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 6 - Saare Asset

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Amboromana Well Project - Madagascar

Amboromana Well Project - Madagascar Under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Felicia Tobias, this project is to build 4 wells in the Amboromana district of Vohemar, Madagascar.

There are currently 360 families living in the area, with population of 1,836 people.

There is only one public tap serving all the families and it often runs dry. People have to fetch water from a very distant dirty river, or do without.

The residents are very poor and have little to no disposable income to support a well project on their own.

Amboromana Well Project - Madagascar Oversight of the well construction will be undertaken by ARES, a local NGO. Sister Rosalie, a Malagasy local, will be spearheading the construction of the project ensuring that fair and honest prices and wages are paid.

Project funds will be used for materials, including cement, rebar, and well covers, and also for transport of materials and labor.

The community will provide some of the basic materials that can be gathered locally, including gravel, sand, and rocks, and also some of the unskilled labor. This will amount to about 25% of the total cost.

After construction, the well will be maintained by the community.

Amboromana Well Project - Madagascar Visits by health workers will educate the population about clean drinking water and ensure proper use of the wells.

The project will result in safe clean drinking water within a reasonable distance for the 1,836 inhabitants of the community.

The Water Charity participation in this project has been funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative and Positive H2O (+H2O).

Any additional donations using the Donate button below will be used to fund other projects by this PCV and/or those of other PCVs in the host country.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 5 - Karang

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 5 - Karang This project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

Garrison reports:

Probably the hardest part of this project is the fact that Marcie and I are installing a new pump every week. That might sound pretty obvious as the project is titled 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks, but nevertheless I find myself a little surprised every time it’s my turn again to install a pump. Also, fresh off the trials and tribulations of Massarinko and hearing of Marcie's rainy season and welder woes, I wasn't feeling quite ready at the beginning of this week to tackle yet another installation.

Such is life however and the relentless march of time waits for no one.

Due to other projects and scheduling problems I wasn't able to come to Karang when the group was making the well cap, which added to my nerves, and rightfully so because when I got there it just wasn't quite right. The cap was too thin, and the bolts securing the pump into the cement weren't holding very well. We decided to go ahead with the install anyway though, and see about repairs later.

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 5 - Karang We started by cleaning off the bottom of the cap, and then lifted the entire half cap and pump onto the well. We installed the piping and the rope and amazingly encountered none of the exasperating problems of the previous pump.

I started to feel a little more confident, which is always a bad sign. The install took all of about 30 min and then we were ready to try the pump. You've probably guessed by now that it didn't work. Well you're right. For some reason the wheel was spinning but it wasn't able to grip the rope, and thus the pump wasn't bringing up water. We fiddled for a while and eventually decided that the knots on the rope were too far apart this time so the wheel didn't have anything to grip except for the slick rope. I told everyone that I would be back in a few days with a new rope so that we could finish the install.

I went back to village that day a little disappointed, and more than a little tired, but determined to do right by the group and get the pump up and working as soon as I could. I bought more rope and tied the knots at a closer distance. In the end this rope turned out to be probably my best yet. The distance was great, the knots were smooth and small, and the whole thing passed easily through my now correctly sized test pipe.

I returned triumphantly a few days later with the new rope only to find my fellow PCV Byron standing in a little pool of water next to the well. I asked him where it had come from and he proceeded to turn the wheel of the pump and spill copious amounts of water everywhere without even the slightest hint of slippage on the wheel or any other mechanical problems. I looked at him and said "Alhamdulillah" (Grace be to god). Sometimes there's nothing else to be said. I've been thinking a lot about this, but I honestly can't say why the rope was slipping a few days ago and now it isn't. For once, chance worked in my favor, though so I'm not complaining. I'll take the win.

The well cap still has a few problems so while we're posting the completion now I will be back to reinforce it with another layer of concrete next week. We're holding off on measuring the output until after this because as is, the pump is really wobbly in the thin cap and we can't get it up to speed to measure the full output. Check back and it will be updated soon.

Pump Output: TBD

Total Number of People Benefiting: 20 (Plus roughly 100 family members)

Funder: Cynthia Connolly

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 5 - KarangConclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 5 - Karang

Future Garden School Water Project – Thailand

Future Garden School Water Project – Thailand Under the direction of Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Mark Cox, this project is to bring a water supply to the Future Garden School from an adjoining property.

Future Garden School is a Burmese migrant learning center located in Phop Phra, Tak province, Thailand. It is located very close to the Burmese border and has 300+ students this year. These students are of mixed ethnicities, and their families have recently fled from Burma into Thailand looking for better opportunities and education. In addition to running classes for kindergarten through 5th grade, the school also runs a boarding house for over 30 of the students whose homes are too far away from the school to travel on a daily basis.

Their current problem arises from a lack of access to water. Last year they had a connection to a neighbor’s well. However, the well was downhill from the school, which required the school to purchase a pump. Due to a less-than-desirable neighbor and an isolated location of the well, the pump was broken several times and the principal of the learning center, Nwe Ni Win, decided to discontinue collaborating with this neighbor.

Nwe Ni Win recently arranged to obtain water from the other neighbor, who is a Thai village headman and has proven to be much more helpful with the school. This new well is uphill from the school, which eliminates the need for an electric pump.

Project funds will be used to purchase materials, including water pipe and glue, and pay some labor costs, to bring the water from the property of the neighbor. The school will contribute over 1/3 of the project cost.

Five members of the local Thai community will be chosen by the village headman to work on the project, which will last a total of four days.

This project will ensure that these 300 students can continue their education while having safe and clean conditions, something that their parents envisioned when leaving Burma and coming to Thailand.

Mark previously successfully completed the Pa Taan Daai Bathroom Project - Thailand during his service as a Peace Corps Volunteer. As a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, he proceeded to complete the Ban Huay Lue Luang Bathroom Project - Thailand.

This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Mark of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Mark and/or other projects in the country of service.

Future Garden School Water Project – ThailandFuture Garden School Water Project – Thailand

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 4 – Samba Thika

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 4 – Samba ThikaThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

Marcie reports:

The pump installation in Saare Samba Thika was different in many ways. The challenges in weather, the triumphs with the new members of our team, the demographic of well users and even the shape of the well were unlike what we had seen before.

Saare Samba Thika is composed of 98 people and only two wells. Of the two wells in town one has drinkable water and it is located in the largest compound in the village. We usually do not install a pump for an individual compound, but this is a special case. The compound itself has 46 members which composes more than half of the town. The compound and its well are very much a community space. All 98 members of town drink from this well and most come to hang out under the mango tree that sits directly in the center of the compound.

The wells in Samba Thika are square. I thought this might pose a problem for the mason, who is used to working with circular wells, but Sow (the mason) handled it like the professional he is and fashioned a perfectly fitting well cap.

Between the time of making the well cap and the 4-5 days it takes for the cement to dry properly we ran into some roadblocks. Almost instantly Saare Samba Thika’s community pump became slow moving. There were two major reasons: 1. Rainy Season and 2. Training a New Welder.

1. Tobugol [tōb- Ū- gŭl]- to rain.
Though tobugol’s meaning is translated to, to rain; to rain and tobugol are not synonyms. To rain is a complete understatement. It is more like Allah himself is directing hundreds of hands to pump a synchronized symphony of hundreds of wells onto the Koldan land and once the rain has stopped you’re left feeling like the last cheerio in the bowl; soggy and surrounded by liquid.

Rainy season is now upon us! It is clear that we will need to be more prepared, with more materials on hand, and be ready to install as soon as it is sunny out.

2. Introducing Sow.
Sow is our new welder. He is a short and stocky man who wears a winter hat and heavy jacket even on the hottest of days. He owns a small space on the main road into Kolda where he and his team of 9 weld doors, chariots, seeders, motorcycles, and almost any other thing of which you can think.

Sow is a brilliant man who clearly loves his profession. It has only been a week and a half since we started with Sow, but each time I stop by his place he is bursting out of his winter jacket to tell me of a new slight tweak he has made to the pumps to make them better. His most recent invention is a pump for schools designed so that the headmaster can take the handle off during recess.

Though Saare Samba Thika’s pump installation took longer than expected I think we gained some valuable insight and members to the team because of it. In rare instances, I guess it is okay to not be on time.

Pump Output: 36 Liters/ Min

Total Number of People Benefiting: 98

Funder: Mara Hunter Redden

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 4 – Samba ThikaConclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 4 – Samba Thika

Conclusion of Packalinding Kafo Community Garden Project – The Gambia

Conclusion of Packalinding Kafo Community Garden Project – The GambiaThis project was completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Shayla Summerhill. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project was to create a community garden in a village in The Gambia. Water Charity participated in the water-related aspects of the garden, including the construction of the garden well.

Shayla reports:

The objective of this project was to alleviate poverty and foster food security in the community. The community members were very positive and motivated to get the job completed efficiently and correctly.

45 people directly benefited from this project. The garden will help to generate income and give people variety in their diet.

We extend our thanks to Shayla for completing this important project.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 5 - Karang

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 5 - KarangThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Karang, Fatick, Senegal

Community Description
In 2010, a group of about 20 people, mostly women, formed a gardening group in a small space just outside of Karang right on the Gambian border. The husband of one of the women generously agreed to let them use his land free of charge.

The group took this initial gift and ran with it, creating a beautiful and productive garden full of hot peppers, cabbage, onions, eggplant, bananas, and citrus trees just to name a few. Currently their field is split into 20 individual plots centered around two fairly shallow wells.

Due to the high volume of people around these two wells watering can be both tedious and time consuming.

Project Description
The installation of this pump means that one person will be able to pull water at a faster rate for the entire group. The well has a water basin attached which can hold approximately 5000 L of water, which when full facilitates easy and fast watering for everyone.

Project Impact
The 20 women with individual plots will directly benefit along with their entire families.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Garrison Harward, Byron Yee, Will Leborgne , and Cassie Blass

Comments
Insa Senghor, one of the leaders of the group explained their motivation:

“Last year these women wanted to start a garden. None of them had any work, but you can make a lot of money selling vegetables. This pump is good because it makes their work easier and we can water faster. If this pump works well, we already have plans to install it in other fields.”

Dollar Amount of Project
$100.00

Donations Collected to Date
$100.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Cynthia Connolly, of Carpinteria, CA, USA.

If you now contribute $100, your name will be placed on the waiting list to adopt the next project in order.

If you wish to contribute less than $100, the money will be applied toward the overall program

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 5 - Karang52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 5 - Karang

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of Safe Water Now Project – Japan

Conclusion of Safe Water Now Project – JapanThis project has been completed. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project was to provide an immediate relief effort in Japan by shipping a truckload of 52,800 cans of water for immediate distribution to persons living in evacuation centers, schools, and orphanages.

In partnership with CannedWater4Kids, the truckload of canned water was prepared, packed, and shipped according to plan.

Second Harvest Japan took possession of the water in Japan and arranged for distribution.

Charles E. McJilton, CEO / Executive Director of Second Harvest, reports:

  1. We distributed the water to relief agencies working in the Minami-sanriku area.  This town was completely decimated and now must rely on water from outside the area.
  2. We added the water to care packages we sent out to people in temporary housing.
  3. We handed out water to individuals who came to pick up food from us in Minami-soma on June 4th. Here is a video of some of the distribution:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sojYPXgK1sc&feature=feedwll&list=WL

Thank you for your support.

We again wish to thank Six Senses Resorts & Spas for providing the funding for this project.

Conclusion of Safe Water Now Project – JapanConclusion of Safe Water Now Project – Japan
Conclusion of Safe Water Now Project – JapanConclusion of Safe Water Now Project – Japan

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 4 – Samba Thika

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 4 - Samba ThikaThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Samba Thika, Kolda, Senegal

Community Description
Samba Thika is one in a cluster of 3 small villages. There are less than 100 people living here, about 23 k North of Kolda. The terrain is hilly and serene. Though it lacks vegetation, there is something magical about the village itself. It is somewhat of an oasis in a vast expanse of tall brush, and when you step into the village perimeter you feel at least 5 degrees cooler from the sheer amount of trees the village has planted.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 4 - Samba ThikaAs is the case with most Pulaar villages in Senegal, their primary sources of income are agriculture and raising cows. They grow veggies in the wet season, pick mangoes in the dry season, and raise cows for yogurt and milk all year around.

Half of Samba Thika is one family. The family compound has 46 members most of whom are children. The new Mayor of the village, Samba Balde, is highly motivated and is helping the women of Samba Thika start a community garden, and searching for funds to build a health post in town.

Project Description
The plan for the pump in Samba Thika is slightly different from that of the pumps previously built. First off, the well is square and the walls are narrow, which may prove to be a small issue for the mason. Also, it is interesting in its placement. We have decided to place this pump at an individual’s house and not in a group space. This may seem a bit odd, but this one house makes up more than half of the members of the village, and of the 2 wells in village, this one is the cleanest.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 4 - Samba ThikaProject Impact
All 98 people in town will benefit from the installation, as they all use the compound’s well for drinking water.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Marcie Todd

Comments
This project once again demonstrates the insight and flexibility that the team must exhibit in order to keep this program on schedule, within budget, and successful.

Dollar Amount of Project
$100.00

Donations Collected to Date
$100.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Mara Hunter Redden, of Ojai, CA, USA.

If you now contribute $100, your name will be placed on the waiting list to adopt the next project in order.

If you wish to contribute less than $100, the money will be applied toward the overall program

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.



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Water Charity Honored

Water Charity Honored by Metropolitan Water District on World Water Day 2010

Water Charity was honored by the Metroplitan Water District and Friends of United Nations on World Water Day 2010 for our work in helping people obtain clean water worldwide.

WHO Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality

The Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality, third edition is now available as one integrated volume incorporating revisions reflected in the First and Second addenda.

http://bit.ly/2T08O

Quotations

Water is the only drink for a wise man.
Henry David Thoreau
US Transcendentalist author (1817 - 1862)