The mission of Water Charity is to implement immediate, efficient, and practical projects around the world to provide safe water and effective sanitation to those in need.


52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 2 - Saare Yero Diao

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 2 - Saare Yero DiaoThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Saare Yero Diao, Kolda, Senegal

Community Description
Yero Diao is a small village of 170 people located in the south of Senegal, West of Kolda. It was founded 32 years ago by Mr. Yero Diao himself. Yero in Pulaar (the local language) means example and Diao is a familiar last name.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 2 - Saare Yero DiaoThe village’s primary sources of income are agriculture and silviculture. They grow veggies in the wet season and pick mangoes and cashews in the dry season. Yero Diao is about 15 k from the main road, 22k from Kolda and completely off the grid. They have no electricity, running water or health post, but they do have an awful lot of mangoes. In fact, every time a ripe mango falls from the trees, you hear a thud, “DOGE!” and then everyone in village runs to see who gets to eat the ripe mango.

Project Description
Cawral, the woman’s group in Yero Diao, established a community garden a few years back. This garden gives local women income needed to buy new clothes and send their kids to school and allows them to increase the overall nutritional levels in their households.

There is one rather large and deep well in the garden, from which mostly young women pull water. Providing this village with a rope pump will make pulling water more efficient. It will increase the amount of water they can pull in a given amount of time allowing them to focus more energy tending to their plants and increasing overall yields.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 2 - Saare Yero DiaoProject Impact
The 37 members of the women's group will directly benefit from this pump along with all of those who use the pump for daily water access- showers, drinking, and cooking. When we asked Demba Balde, the Mayor of the village, how many people he thought would benefit from the installation of the rope pump he said, “I think the whole town will benefit.”

Comments
It is exciting to see this program move on to the second pump. Please tell your friends about it, and get ready to step up and adopt your very own pump as we proceed each week through the year.

Dollar Amount of Project
$100.00

Donations Collected to Date
$100.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Katherine Murray, of San Leandro, CA, USA.

If you wish to contribute funds to go the overall program, go to the 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program - Senegal page and click on the general Donate button there.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of Punta Sirain Water System Project – Panama

Conclusion of Punta Sirain Water System Project – PanamaThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Kaitlin Green. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to provide water for the community through a system comprised of a spring catchment box, an aqueduct system, neighborhood tap stands, and individual home rainwater catchment installations.

Upon the request of the community, the project was modified to expand the rainwater catchment and distribution segment, and leave the improvement of the functioning spring box for a later time.

Kaitlin reports:

The rainwater tank project in Punta Sirain has been completed! We were able to install rainwater catchment systems in 40 homes. Each consisted of a 100-gallon tank and a complete roof collection system. Piping was run to the kitchen of each home, and faucets were installed.

We used an interactive project plan that only rewarded the families with a tank after they contributed 5% of the tank cost and provided materials for the base structure to support the tank.

Additionally, we created a cement base beneath the school's 500-gallon tank to create a cleaner area for the students to drink from.

Over all, I was incredibly impressed with the enthusiasm, participation, energy, and ownership the community exemplified throughout the project planning, setup, and implementation.

This project has left a lasting and visual connection to teamwork, motivation, and self- sustainability that the inhabitants will not soon forget.

We again wish to thank The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust for providing the funding for this project.

Conclusion of Punta Sirain Water System Project – PanamaConclusion of Punta Sirain Water System Project – Panama
Conclusion of Punta Sirain Water System Project – PanamaConclusion of Punta Sirain Water System Project – Panama

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 1 - Dassilame Serere

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 1 - Dassilame SerereThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Dassilame Serere, Kaolack, Senegal

Community Description
Dassilame Serere is a small village of just over 500 people located in the delta region of Senegal. Its primary source of income is agriculture, but because of the beautiful landscape of the delta filled with mangroves, birds, and plentiful marine life, it has also become somewhat of an eco-tourism destination and now has several small hotels called campements. These along with the rest of the village are completely off the grid and rely solely on well water for drinking, irrigation, and other household needs.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 1 - Dassilame SerereProject Description
Pape Diouf, a native of the village, established one of these campements in 2007 and shortly after used the proceeds from it to start a one-hectare women’s garden on the premises. This garden gives local women a secondary source of income and allows them to increase the overall nutritional level of their households. There is one well in the garden from which everyone pulls water. The plan is to install one rope pump on the well to increase the overall ease and speed of watering this large space.

Project Impact
The members of the women's group will directly benefit from this pump along with many others who occasionally help with the garden. This first pump will also expose other groups to this technology and encourage them to join the project or even look into purchasing a pump on their own.

Comments
For more information on Pape's Eco-Capmepent check out his website: http://papediouf.uniterre.com/

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 1 - Dassilame SerereDollar Amount of Project
$100.00

Donations Collected to Date
$100.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity or Randall Harward, of Ojai, CA, USA.

If you wish to contribute funds to go the overall program, go to the 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program - Senegal page and click on the general Donate button there.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program - Senegal

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program This is a program being undertaken by Water Charity in partnership with Peace Corps Senegal. The tremendously ambitious objective is to build 52 water pumps in Senegal in 52 weeks!

The program is being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. The technology is the tried-and-proven rope pump system. It is inexpensive, provides a sizable output, is easy to build using local materials, and is simple to maintain.

Marcie demonstrated the technology in the Usine Coton Rope Pump Project - Senegal.

Marcie and Garrison explain the benefits:

It is our hope that these pumps will ease the difficulty and increase the overall speed of pulling water, freeing women to either expand their agricultural production, thereby increasing their food security and economic independence, or allow them to engage in secondary income generating activities for which they may previously not have had the time to explore.

You will be able to follow the 52 Projects in 52 Weeks Blog that has been developed and will be maintained by Marcie and Garrison.

One pump will be built each week in the Kolda and Kaolack regions of Senegal. We will put up a project page with a simple description of each project, and refer you back to the blog for a more complete description.

You may “adopt” a pump on a first-come-first-served basis. We will post a new well each week on the Water Charity website. If you click on the Donate button it is yours for $150. That means you can dedicate it, name it, tell your friends about it, or do what you want to with it.

(The first 21 pumps were priced at $100 each. The new price of $150 is closer to the actual cost for a pump, as it includes pay for the skilled workers who are actually doing the installations.)

Come back to this page as we add a new project each week:

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 1 - Dassilame Serere

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 2 - Saare Yero Diao

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 3 - Massarinko

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 4 - Samba Thika

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 5 - Karang

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 6 - Saare Asset

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 7 - Keur Andallah

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 8 - Hann Maristes Youth Prison, Dakar

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 9 - Thies, Peace Corps Training Center

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 10 - Saare Gouna, Community Garden

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 11 - Thiawando

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 12 - Dantaxoune

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 13 - Dassilame Serere Eco Campament

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 14 - Dassilame Serere Revisited

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 15 - Daro Keur Ibrahima Signane

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 16 - Daro Keur Ibrahima Signane, Community Garden

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 17 – Faraba, Moringa Garden

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 18 - Faraba, Moringa Garden (Part 2)

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 19 - Thiawando, Community Well.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 20 - Saare Dagua, Community Well.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 21 - Sincan Samba Koulibaly, Urban Garden.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 22 - Thiewol Lao, Master Farm.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 23 - Nema Bah, Pump Repair.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 24 - Nema Bah, Pump Repair Continued

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 25 - Segou, Eco-Campament Well

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 26 - Segou, Community Well

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 27 - Sare Samba Diaba

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 28 - Sare Salamata, Master Farm

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 29 - Sippo, Community Garden Well

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 30 - Toubacouta, Community Garden Well

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 31 - Saare Bidji, Community Well

If you would like to make a general donation of any amount to the 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, you may do so by clicking on the Donate button below. Any donations above the actual program costs will be used to fund other projects in Senegal.

We are grateful to the following for their generous donations of $500 for the program:

David Allen, of Ojai, CA, USA

Ram Sareen, of Los Angeles, CA, USA

CannedWater4Kids, of Sussex, WI, USA

Conclusion of Huanaco Community Latrine Project – Peru

Conclusion of Huanaco Community Latrine Project – PeruThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Frieda von Qualen. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to build two public bathrooms (each bathroom having a men's and a women's room), for the use of the entire community.

Frieda reports that the municipality completed the construction within budget. Funds from Water Charity went directly toward buying the building materials. The community supplied bricks, some roofing materials, labor, and tools.

Frieda expressed her thanks:

On behalf of the community in Huanaco in Ica, Peru, I want to thank you for your generosity in helping build public bathrooms in Huanaco. For many families the public bathroom is the only bathroom they have access to.

Conclusion of Huanaco Community Latrine Project – PeruThe hygiene commission helped carry out various educational sessions about how to make safe drinking water in the home, how to separate trash, when to wash hands, and how to block the various routes of contamination.

To see the back of Frieda’s thank-you card, CLICK HERE.

We again wish to thank The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust for providing the funding for this project.

Conclusion of Huanaco Community Latrine Project – PeruConclusion of Huanaco Community Latrine Project – Peru
Conclusion of Huanaco Community Latrine Project – Peru

Safe Water Now Project – Japan

Safe Water Now Project – Japan The earthquake and tsunami in Japan on March 13, 2011 caused widespread devastation. More than 10,000 people died, 40,000 people were evacuated, 90,000 buildings were damaged, 850,000 people were left without electricity and water, and 300,000 people were living in shelters.

Although Water Charity’s main mission is sustainable development, when a disaster of this magnitude arises, it is impossible to ignore the need for an immediate relief effort to save lives. For that reason, on April 21, we participated in the shipment of a truckload of canned water (52,800 12-ounce cans) for immediate distribution to persons living in evacuation centers, schools, and orphanages.

The shipment was made in partnership with CannedWater4Kids, a Wisconsin nonprofit. They were able to negotiate substantial donations of services, including shipping, and also arrange for distribution through Second Harvest of Japan, an organization with extensive distribution channels.

The shipment was made possible by funding from The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust, which sprang into action immediately to raise funds for a substantial relief program.

In our effort to provide help to the people in Japan immediately after the earthquake, we faced with a situation more dire and more complex than any previously imagined. The release of nuclear particles into the atmosphere and into the water presented extreme problems.

Our first thought was to implement a water filtration solution. Over the past 3 years, we have undertaken many filter projects in all corners of the globe. Each project is vastly different, as there are different needs, different locally-used technologies, and different contaminants to be removed.

After going through our toolkit of technologies, we were left with the startling observation that none of our traditional filtration techniques would be satisfactory in this instance. Filters are available that can remove certain radioactive particles. However, Japan faced a problem where many different types of radiation were found in the water, depending on the location.

Furthermore, a solution based on filtration introduced a host of new problems, including how to dispose of the filter when it was necessary to do so. The simple answer is that a team of hazardous waste experts would have to properly handle this waste and then safely dispose of it. The experts and the places for safe disposal do not currently exist!

Meanwhile, we were getting reports of radioactivity detected in the drinking water as far away as Tokyo. Pregnant women and infants were advised not to drink the tap water, and local sources of pure water were inadequate.

It was at that time that the urgency of getting safe water to Japan at once became apparent, and the solution became obvious: Send safe water at once!

If you had asked us on March 1 what we would think about sending packaged water halfway around the world, we would have said: “That’s nuts!” The cost per liter of water is huge, and the energy cost of packing, shipping, and disposing of the packaging is enormous.

However, in this instance, it appeared as a literal lifesaver, that could be implemented at once. Not only could we put safe water immediately into the hands of those who needed it to survive, we could actually do it more cheaply than any filter solution we had been considering!

The canned water solution satisfied an immediate need as a part of a massive relief effort put into force by millions of people in hundreds of countries. We are now concentrating on longer-range development assistance to help the Japanese people get back on their feet. Your help is requested in this endeavor. Please use the Donate button below to direct your donation to the development effort in Japan.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of Saly Escale Well Project – Senegal

Conclusion of Saly Escale Well Project – SenegalThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Matthew Gardine. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project was to build a new well to provide potable water for community use, and also yield water for the irrigation of the community garden.

To read Matthew’s final report in its entirety, CLICK HERE. It makes great reading, providing an insight into the process, incorporating valuable sociological observations, and revealing the tremendous benefits that the project will yield for the community.

Here is a summary of the key points taken from the final report:

Community leaders determined that a new well was a primary need for the village. Because of the growth of Saly Escale, most of the compounds now sit a great distance from the only other well in the community. A large amount of time was being spent by girls and women to carry basins of water to their homes in the mornings and early evenings, time which could be better spent.

Conclusion of Saly Escale Well Project – SenegalIn addition, a year-round gardening program could not be sustained without obtaining a nearby source of water for irrigation.

The project became a reality when a commitment for funding was obtained. Shortly thereafter, in December, 2010, the funding was received and the project was underway with the purchase of supplies in Koungheul, Saly Escale’s nearest large town. In addition to the requisite pickaxes, shovels, buckets, and iron-working tools, we ordered four tons of cement that would line the well’s internal walls as well as the iron reinforcement rods that would be fashioned to form the well’s metal “skeleton.” Both sets of materials were purchased in quantities that would insure uninterrupted construction to a depth of 20 meters, should the water table have sunk that low by the height of the drought season in April and May.

The next step was to determine the well’s exact location, utilizing the services of a descendent of a long line of “water seekers,” people reputedly capable of discovering the path of least resistance to the best underground water sources.

Ground was broken on 6 February 2011 by the master digger and a team of three associate diggers. They dug with pickaxes and shovels and without the aid of machines. Knowing the depth of the village’s existing well, we estimated the depth of the water table to be 16 meters.

On 24 March 2010 the diggers struck water at a depth of 12 meters, but, due to a sudden onset of stomach illness, the master digger was unable to continue digging the remaining few meters that would insure a reliable water source during both rainy and drought seasons in which the water table tends to fluctuate dramatically.

Returning to work in late April (the height of the drought season), the master digger finally dug the well to its current depth and the above-ground rim was constructed.

Immediately thereafter, the concrete “skirt” was fashioned at its base. The skirt serves to direct outside water and pollutants away from the well, thus preventing contamination.

On 26 April 2011, my home stay host, my work partner, and I met with the master digger one final time to measure the well’s depth (15.5 m), verify contract compliance, and provide full and final payment.

We extend our deep gratitude to Matthew for completing this project, and again wish to thank The Montgomery College Office of Study and Travel Abroad, and the students of Montgomery College for providing the funding.

Conclusion of Saly Escale Well Project – SenegalConclusion of Saly Escale Well Project – Senegal
Conclusion of Saly Escale Well Project – SenegalConclusion of Saly Escale Well Project – Senegal
Conclusion of Saly Escale Well Project – SenegalConclusion of Saly Escale Well Project – Senegal
Conclusion of Saly Escale Well Project – SenegalConclusion of Saly Escale Well Project – Senegal

Jaidee Daycare Center Flood Remediation and Water Project – Thailand

Jaidee Daycare Center Flood Remediation and Water Project – ThailandThe Jaidee Daycare Development Center is a children’s center under the supervision of Jaidee Sub-District Administrative Office located in Thailand’s Northeastern province of Sisaket.

Jaidee Daycare accommodates 60 students, ages 2-4. The building experiences two significant problems, namely flooding during the rainy season and the poor quality of water for the consumption of students and staff. This project, under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Heidi Mahoney, addresses both problems.

The daycare building itself sits on a lowland silt area. Often during the monsoon rainy season, rain pours down in short, yet heavy showers. During these torrential rains, water mixed with mud, silt, and various ground residue, gushes into the daycare building. This causes a huge mess that often makes it necessary to close the building, and results in highly unhygienic conditions and increased susceptibility to water-borne disease.

Jaidee Daycare Center Flood Remediation and Water Project – ThailandThe first part of this project addresses the flooding issue by constructing a new drainage system and elevating common ground around the daycare with concrete beams.

Two diagonal gutters starting at the roof will funnel rainwater into a drain connected to the village drainage system. In addition, concrete beams affixed around the structure will prevent water from entering the building.

Currently, there is no running water in the building, other than in the bathrooms. Most importantly, the water quality is not guaranteed. Water for personal use is accessed from local wells filled with unsanitary ground water, which is often unsuitable for even hand-washing and brushing teeth.

Jaidee Daycare Center Flood Remediation and Water Project – ThailandThe daycare teachers have to purchase large jugs of drinking water to stock the daycare. Also, there are no sinks for dish washing or for children to wash their hands before and after meals and after using the restroom.

The second part of this project is for the purchase of a water purification tank connected to a common water canteen as well as the installation of sinks with running water.

Project funds will be used for the tank and PVC supply and drainage piping. Labor will be provided by the community.

In addition to the day care teachers and children, approximately 1,452 local villagers will be able to access this water source for drinking and household use.

This project has the support of teachers, parents, and local administrators who recognize its importance and have pledged the necessary resources. This will ensure the sustainability of the project far into the future.

This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Heidi of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by the PCV and/or other projects in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of Gregorio Ferro-Cement Tank and Rainwater Catchment Project – Brazil

Conclusion of Gregorio Ferro-Cement Tank and Rainwater Catchment Project – BrazilThis project has been completed under the direction of Rosângela Araújo, Vice President of Instituto Diamante Verde (IDV). To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to build a rainwater catchment system and ferro-cement tank in the village of Gregório.

Rosângela reports:

It took 5 months to complete the project, under the direct supervision of Professor Manuela, now elected head of the Association and representative of the Instituto Diamante Verde in Gregório.

This year something really amazing happened in Queimadas/Gregório village. During the summer season 2010/2011, the news showed the tragic scene of 22 villages facing water shortages due to a lack of rain. However, due to the adoption of a program to build ferro-cement tanks, Queimadas had the capacity to capture sufficient rainwater to fulfill the basic consumption needs of the communities that make up the municipality.

Conclusion of Gregorio Ferro-Cement Tank and Rainwater Catchment Project – BrazilThe pictures show the proven construction techniques that resulted in the completion of the collection and storage system in Quemadas. As a result, 580 people now have an adequate water supply.

The completion of this project makes possible additional development efforts, under the direction of IDV, for the benefit of the community. These include a tree nursery and erosion control program as well as a gardening program to grow organic vegetables, legumes and fruits for the consumption of the students. Finally, moringa trees are being planted around the natural water source. This not only prevents evaporation but also produces leaves and other components with significant nutritional benefit.

We wish to extend our thanks to Rosângela for carrying out this great project, and creating a model to follow for similar projects in the municipality.

We again wish to thank The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust for providing the funding for the project.

To read an update onthe project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of Gregorio Ferro-Cement Tank and Rainwater Catchment Project – BrazilConclusion of Gregorio Ferro-Cement Tank and Rainwater Catchment Project – Brazil
Conclusion of Gregorio Ferro-Cement Tank and Rainwater Catchment Project – BrazilConclusion of Gregorio Ferro-Cement Tank and Rainwater Catchment Project – Brazil
Conclusion of Gregorio Ferro-Cement Tank and Rainwater Catchment Project – BrazilConclusion of Gregorio Ferro-Cement Tank and Rainwater Catchment Project – Brazil
Conclusion of Gregorio Ferro-Cement Tank and Rainwater Catchment Project – BrazilConclusion of Gregorio Ferro-Cement Tank and Rainwater Catchment Project – Brazil
Conclusion of Gregorio Ferro-Cement Tank and Rainwater Catchment Project – BrazilConclusion of Gregorio Ferro-Cement Tank and Rainwater Catchment Project – Brazil
Conclusion of Gregorio Ferro-Cement Tank and Rainwater Catchment Project – BrazilConclusion of Gregorio Ferro-Cement Tank and Rainwater Catchment Project – Brazil




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Water Charity Honored

Water Charity Honored by Metropolitan Water District on World Water Day 2010

Water Charity was honored by the Metroplitan Water District and Friends of United Nations on World Water Day 2010 for our work in helping people obtain clean water worldwide.

WHO Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality

The Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality, third edition is now available as one integrated volume incorporating revisions reflected in the First and Second addenda.

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Quotations

Water is the only drink for a wise man.
Henry David Thoreau
US Transcendentalist author (1817 - 1862)