The mission of Water Charity is to implement immediate, efficient, and practical projects around the world to provide safe water and effective sanitation to those in need.


Conclusion of Packalinding Kafo Community Garden Project – The Gambia

Conclusion of Packalinding Kafo Community Garden Project – The GambiaThis project was completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Shayla Summerhill. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project was to create a community garden in a village in The Gambia. Water Charity participated in the water-related aspects of the garden, including the construction of the garden well.

Shayla reports:

The objective of this project was to alleviate poverty and foster food security in the community. The community members were very positive and motivated to get the job completed efficiently and correctly.

45 people directly benefited from this project. The garden will help to generate income and give people variety in their diet.

We extend our thanks to Shayla for completing this important project.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 5 - Karang

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 5 - KarangThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Karang, Fatick, Senegal

Community Description
In 2010, a group of about 20 people, mostly women, formed a gardening group in a small space just outside of Karang right on the Gambian border. The husband of one of the women generously agreed to let them use his land free of charge.

The group took this initial gift and ran with it, creating a beautiful and productive garden full of hot peppers, cabbage, onions, eggplant, bananas, and citrus trees just to name a few. Currently their field is split into 20 individual plots centered around two fairly shallow wells.

Due to the high volume of people around these two wells watering can be both tedious and time consuming.

Project Description
The installation of this pump means that one person will be able to pull water at a faster rate for the entire group. The well has a water basin attached which can hold approximately 5000 L of water, which when full facilitates easy and fast watering for everyone.

Project Impact
The 20 women with individual plots will directly benefit along with their entire families.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Garrison Harward, Byron Yee, Will Leborgne , and Cassie Blass

Comments
Insa Senghor, one of the leaders of the group explained their motivation:

“Last year these women wanted to start a garden. None of them had any work, but you can make a lot of money selling vegetables. This pump is good because it makes their work easier and we can water faster. If this pump works well, we already have plans to install it in other fields.”

Dollar Amount of Project
$100.00

Donations Collected to Date
$100.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Cynthia Connolly, of Carpinteria, CA, USA.

If you now contribute $100, your name will be placed on the waiting list to adopt the next project in order.

If you wish to contribute less than $100, the money will be applied toward the overall program

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 5 - Karang52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 5 - Karang

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of Safe Water Now Project – Japan

Conclusion of Safe Water Now Project – JapanThis project has been completed. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project was to provide an immediate relief effort in Japan by shipping a truckload of 52,800 cans of water for immediate distribution to persons living in evacuation centers, schools, and orphanages.

In partnership with CannedWater4Kids, the truckload of canned water was prepared, packed, and shipped according to plan.

Second Harvest Japan took possession of the water in Japan and arranged for distribution.

Charles E. McJilton, CEO / Executive Director of Second Harvest, reports:

  1. We distributed the water to relief agencies working in the Minami-sanriku area.  This town was completely decimated and now must rely on water from outside the area.
  2. We added the water to care packages we sent out to people in temporary housing.
  3. We handed out water to individuals who came to pick up food from us in Minami-soma on June 4th. Here is a video of some of the distribution:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sojYPXgK1sc&feature=feedwll&list=WL

Thank you for your support.

We again wish to thank Six Senses Resorts & Spas for providing the funding for this project.

Conclusion of Safe Water Now Project – JapanConclusion of Safe Water Now Project – Japan
Conclusion of Safe Water Now Project – JapanConclusion of Safe Water Now Project – Japan

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 4 – Samba Thika

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 4 - Samba ThikaThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Samba Thika, Kolda, Senegal

Community Description
Samba Thika is one in a cluster of 3 small villages. There are less than 100 people living here, about 23 k North of Kolda. The terrain is hilly and serene. Though it lacks vegetation, there is something magical about the village itself. It is somewhat of an oasis in a vast expanse of tall brush, and when you step into the village perimeter you feel at least 5 degrees cooler from the sheer amount of trees the village has planted.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 4 - Samba ThikaAs is the case with most Pulaar villages in Senegal, their primary sources of income are agriculture and raising cows. They grow veggies in the wet season, pick mangoes in the dry season, and raise cows for yogurt and milk all year around.

Half of Samba Thika is one family. The family compound has 46 members most of whom are children. The new Mayor of the village, Samba Balde, is highly motivated and is helping the women of Samba Thika start a community garden, and searching for funds to build a health post in town.

Project Description
The plan for the pump in Samba Thika is slightly different from that of the pumps previously built. First off, the well is square and the walls are narrow, which may prove to be a small issue for the mason. Also, it is interesting in its placement. We have decided to place this pump at an individual’s house and not in a group space. This may seem a bit odd, but this one house makes up more than half of the members of the village, and of the 2 wells in village, this one is the cleanest.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 4 - Samba ThikaProject Impact
All 98 people in town will benefit from the installation, as they all use the compound’s well for drinking water.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Marcie Todd

Comments
This project once again demonstrates the insight and flexibility that the team must exhibit in order to keep this program on schedule, within budget, and successful.

Dollar Amount of Project
$100.00

Donations Collected to Date
$100.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Mara Hunter Redden, of Ojai, CA, USA.

If you now contribute $100, your name will be placed on the waiting list to adopt the next project in order.

If you wish to contribute less than $100, the money will be applied toward the overall program

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 3 – Massarinko

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 3 – MassarinkoThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

Garrison reports:

Murphy’s law states: Anything that can go wrong will go wrong. This week I have been fully convinced that this is true. Rest assured the pump is now working, but we said that we would talk frankly about our problems with this project so let me tell you a story.

The morning started out very smoothly. The local Peace Corps Volunteer Will, his counterpart Lamine, and I all went out to the well to check on the half cap we had cast earlier in the week and it looked great. We tipped it up, washed the sand off the bottom and placed it on the well. So far no problems. Suddenly though one of the village children decided to be helpful and carried the cement and PCV turn around block over to me and dropped it at my feet. It had only been cast a few days earlier and now bore a sizable crack from end to end.

Lesson one for the day: don’t let children touch anything!

This was not a huge issue however, so we duct-taped the block to make sure it wouldn’t crack further and then moved on to the next task. This is where everything went wrong. Firstly we threaded the rope the wrong direction through the PCV pipe so that every connector, instead of allowing the rope to smoothly pass from one piece of pipe to the next, was catching the knots. We had to pull the entire apparatus out of the well, flip the pipe around, and re-glue everything.

Lesson two learned: double-check everything before you glue!

The next problem flabbergasted us for about an hour. The rope kept getting stuck again and again even though everything was now going in the right direction. We pulled everything out of the well a second time and it turned out that this time the problem was too much slack. The extra rope was getting tangled on itself and in this instance a section had actually folded over and gotten stuck in the PCV pipe. A little trimming and a second round of re-gluing and we were ready to drop everything back in the well.

Lesson three learned: too much slack can, and therefore will, cause problems.

With everything doubly fixed we prayed that the pump would just work, but of course it didn’t. The wheel was really hard to turn and the output just wasn’t very good. We discussed and tried to find quick solutions before we finally resigned ourselves to pull the piping and cement block out of the well for a third time. By now we were all exhausted and many of the villagers wanted to wait until the next day to finish, but Will, Lamine and I were determined, if not a little stubborn, to get it working.

This final problem was due to the knots themselves. I had tested their size using a piece of regular PCV pipe, which I realized in this moment, is ever so slightly larger than the higher quality pressure PCV we were using here. The knots were too big and that little bit of extra friction was really adding up over the entire distance of the well. We pulled out the rope and Will and I rushed to his hut to melt and reshape the knots until they were small enough to pass smoothly through the pipe.

Lesson four learned: when checking sizing, use the right sized pipe.

Finally we were at the moment of truth… take 3… We lowered everything down, tied off the ends of the rope, and started to turn the wheel. Water! Yes this time it finally worked.

The village instantly forgot about the hardships of the day and started filling their basins and trying out the pump. They were absolutely thrilled. Even through all the frustration this was actually a very useful day as all of these lessons were really important to learn. It was also an excellent way to teach the village how to repair the pump and the kinds of things that might go wrong. Yes sweet are the uses of adversity, but next time Murphy how ‘bout you lay off a little.

Lesson five learned: persistence and hard work pays off!

Pump Output: 41 Liters/ Min

Total Number of People Benefiting: 150

Funder: Leah Gilmore

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 3 – MassarinkoConclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 3 – Massarinko
Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 3 – MassarinkoConclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 3 – Massarinko

Conclusion of Reservoir Construction Project – Ethiopia

Conclusion of Reservoir Construction Project – EthiopiaThis project was been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Gail Bachman. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project was to create a number of stone reservoirs to protect the natural springs that serve the community in order to ensure access to clean drinking water and control water run-off.

Gail reports:

The city municipality management team, consisting of four officials, went to work securing materials and enlisting volunteers while the head of the Woreda Water Department, Tolessa, and I secured the masonry workers for the project.

After extensive negotiations with the head mason and masonry assistant, the resultant contract was 8,000 birr, much higher than what had been originally budgeted. As a result, it was determined that we would only be able to complete two water sites.

Conclusion of Reservoir Construction Project – EthiopiaBy the start of construction at site number one, the city municipality had organized all necessary materials to begin, and 17 people were there with their personal picks, shovels, and hoes ready to clear the land. On day two, 40 community volunteers showed up to carry down heavy large stones and bags of crushed stone and sand to the water site. This was no easy task as the path to the site is very steep and really only meant for one way traffic. But for hours, people worked with smiles on their faces.

Construction of the first site went smoothly despite the size of the water spring and the necessity for it to be accessible to the community at all stages of construction. Each day people commented on the changes and happily continued to bring down materials with each water collection visit.

The first step to protect the site involved building an enclosed area which would collect the water before directing it to the distribution site. The land that surround this water source was then reinforced with stone and cement one meter to each side of the water flow and one meter above to ensure that damage due to seasonal weather (i.e. heavy rain) would not occur.

When the water collection area was cemented and a removable lid (for cleaning purposes) was installed, the water source was protected from any outside contamination. In the next step, a distribution area from which people could easily access this new clean water was created.

With the first site nearly completed work began to prepare the second site. Again volunteers were needed to clear the land and bring down materials, and again they did not disappoint. When construction began, it was immediately apparent that this was going to be an easier site to work at due to its smaller and more centrally directed water source. The building plan went much the same as for the first site, and again community volunteers were eager to help in any way they could.

By the time of the arrival of the rainy season, clean water was flowing from the source to the collection area, and all of the run-off channels had been dug. It remained until the end of the rainy season to place stones in and cement the channels.

The community is very excited and grateful for the improvement in their water sites.

We extend our thanks to Gail for completing the project and to Six Senses Resorts & Spas for providing the funding for the Water Charity participation.

Conclusion of Reservoir Construction Project – EthiopiaConclusion of Reservoir Construction Project – Ethiopia

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 2 - Saare Yero Diao

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 2 - Saare Yero DiaoThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

Marcie and Garrison report:

Early one Sunday morning the mason (Sow), the instructor (Barry) and myself (Marcie), packed all of our materials, put huge smiles on our faces and with the excitement of 40 small kids eating lollipops, we got in a rickety taxi bound for Saare Yero Diao. Though I was smiling on the outside, butterflies were twirling round and round in my stomach for what was to come. I often wonder when the nerves of installing a pump will disappear, but at the same time, maybe those nerves are what keeps us doing good work. I guess only time will tell.

Upon arrival we were greeted by the whole village and immediately went to sit under the mango tree, where people feel automatically comfortable and the habitual last-name banter commenced. “You’re a Balde (typical last-name); you must love beans, you eat them till you’re full, don’t you?!” It is such an interesting way to joke, but it will, without a doubt, get everyone laughing.

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 2 - Saare Yero DiaoWe then started the actual work with most members of the village helping and asking questions. It was all quite magical and exactly the type of participation one wants, but then came the first problem. We realized the bolts we had just cemented into the cap were too big for the pump. This led us to our second problem: we had no ride back to town. Sow, Barry, the pump and myself strapped our shoes on tight and started making the trip back to Kolda. It wasn¹t until the second village we passed that we had some saving grace. The members of Saare Boussura Maka had a chariot on which to bring us home and also have interest in becoming one of the next villages to get a pump.

We headed back to Yero Diao the following Friday fixed pump in hand and a driver that was willing to wait 2 hours for us to install the pump and give a training on how each part works. Once again the whole village was excited and ready to learn. Therefore, the installation went quickly and we even had time to take a large tour of the town and greet everyone in it.

All in all, though the installation of this pump was less than smooth, we learned the importance of being more organized. The women danced and the young ones laughed and played under the spout while the men pumped the water.

Everyone is extremely excited and can see a brighter future for their garden. In fact, the women’s group said they can now sign a contract to produce a large amount of okra for a local NGO.

Pump Output: 26 Liters/ Min

Total Number of People Benefiting: 140

Funder: Katherine Murray

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 2 - Saare Yero DiaoConclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 2 - Saare Yero Diao

Conclusion of Wat Potaram Pre-School Cafeteria Project – Thailand

Conclusion of Wat Potaram Pre-School Cafeteria Project – ThailandThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Heather Chadwick. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project was to provide fixtures and piping for supply, purification, distribution, and wastewater systems in the new cafeteria as part of the larger project to build the cafeteria.

Heather reports:

I'm happy to let you know that the cafeteria and kitchen are finished at the Wat Potaram Preschool in Maha Sarakham Province in Thailand.

Local laborers and parents participated in the actual construction of the cafeteria. The teachers were present to assist, along with providing food and water for the workers throughout the day.

The construction of the cafeteria took 8 weeks from start to finish, from laying the foundation to installation of water systems and electricity, to finally setting up the tables and chairs and decorations.

Water Charity funds were used for piping, plumbing fixtures, and the water treatment system.

The outcome of the construction of the cafeteria has been direct and immediate, as the teachers, cook, and students are able to use the new facility right away. The school now functions more efficiently and effectively as the classroom is no longer used for food distribution and eating. Food distribution and meal times are much more organized and allow for students to line up, wash their hands, and eat at tables and chairs.

The teachers and cook are also able to clean up after meals to a greater extent, because the students are be able to exit the cafeteria and return to the classroom. After immediate adoption of this new system, teachers, student, and cafeteria staff work together to ensure the facility is maintained and fully functioning. Everyone takes responsibility for keeping the area clean and tidy. Any upkeep and repairs necessary can be completed by the pre-school maintenance staff.

Additionally, the teachers have shown initiative to learn more about hand washing and water sanitation lessons to teach the kids. They understand the importance of emphasizing hand washing, particularly before meals. They are committed to ensuring the children maintain this hygienic routine through daily lessons and reminders.

Conclusion of Wat Potaram Pre-School Cafeteria Project – ThailandConclusion of Wat Potaram Pre-School Cafeteria Project – Thailand
Conclusion of Wat Potaram Pre-School Cafeteria Project – ThailandConclusion of Wat Potaram Pre-School Cafeteria Project – Thailand
Conclusion of Wat Potaram Pre-School Cafeteria Project – ThailandConclusion of Wat Potaram Pre-School Cafeteria Project – Thailand
Conclusion of Wat Potaram Pre-School Cafeteria Project – ThailandConclusion of Wat Potaram Pre-School Cafeteria Project – Thailand

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 3 - Massarinko

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 3 - MassarinkoThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Massarinko, Fatick, Senegal

Community Description
Massarinko is a small agricultural village of 416 people located just north of the Gambia and 9 k west of Karang. This unique community lies at a crossroads of both country and ethnicity and is therefore very diverse.

The majority of people are Mandinkan but there are also sizable Serere and Wolof populations and even a few Pulaar families. This means that on any given day one could hear 6 different languages walking through town (that includes Senegal's national language of French, and English because of us PCVs). 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 3 - Massarinko

Most of the village's income comes from farming peanuts, millet, and rice, which are both subsistence and cash crops. A secondary source of income which the village is looking to expand is herding cattle.

There is currently a small basin next to the well where most of the village's cattle come to drink. The basin is often completely dry as it is hand filled with water pulled from the well. This means that the cattle often don't have enough to drink.

In Senegal the dry season is hard on everyone, but it is especially difficult for livestock. The main road from Sokone to Kaolack is littered with carcasses of cows and sheep that didn't make it through the hard times.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 3 - MassarinkoProject Description
The goal of this project is to install a rope pump on the well to ease the difficulty of filling this basin, while also helping the women of the village to more easily pull water for standard household needs such as cooking, bathing, and washing clothes.

Project Impact
While Massarinko has a total of 6 wells, the majority of the households pull water from this one because it is centrally located right next to the Mosque. As a result about 150 people will benefit from this pump, along with around 40 cattle and many more sheep and goats. In reality though if the pump allows the village to support increased cattle production then the impact will be much greater as everyone will benefit from increased income and nutrition.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Garrison Harward & Will Leborgne

Comments
This project brings in a new focus of caring for the animals upon which the villagers depend for their existence.

This week, because of the popularity of this program, we are instituting a “waiting list”. If a project is adopted before you have a chance to contribute your $100, just donate now, and you will get the next one in order.

Dollar Amount of Project
$100.00

Donations Collected to Date
$100.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Leah Gilmore, of San Jose, CA, USA.

If you now contribute $100, your name will be placed on the waiting list to adopt the next project in order.

If you wish to contribute less than $100, the money will be applied toward the overall program. Go to the 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program - Senegal page and click on the general Donate button there.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Barrero Pyta Modern Women's Bathroom Commission Project – Paraguay

Barrero Pyta Modern Women's Bathroom Commission Project – ParaguayUnder the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Carroll Wallace, this project is to build 15 modern bathrooms in Barrero Pyta, Paraguay.

Barrero Pyta sits on the sides of Ruta 8 in the South of the Department of San Pedro in Paraguay. There are about 150 houses and a high population of youth under the age of 26.

The people received both running water and electricity within the last 15 years. The majority makes their living in agriculture, small business, and teaching. There is a high school, an elementary school, two local radio stations and a soccer field.

In Paraguay, waste management and sanitation are dire issues, especially in rural areas. In some places there are no means of waste management. More often, people use poorly constructed latrines nearly full with waste, and lack the education to practice sanitary habits and the money to properly maintain their latrines.

Barrero Pyta Modern Women's Bathroom Commission Project – ParaguayThe Sanitary Bathroom Commission began in March 2009 with over sixty members. Presently, the group has only fifteen members. These women continue to believe their project will come to fruition, and patiently work toward the construction of a modern bathroom in each of their homes.

Currently, the commission sells food, fabric softener, and detergent and hosts movie nights for the community in order to raise funds. Additionally, each woman pays a monthly fee to maintain her commission membership.

The construction of modern bathrooms and the implementation of health lessons will prevent the spread of diarrhea, a leading cause of death among children around the world, lessen the presence of intestinal parasites, and ensure increased sanitary control of human waste.

Barrero Pyta Modern Women's Bathroom Commission Project – ParaguayThe community members will contribute to the cost of the project by providing their own transportations of materials, the cost of manual labor, and the assistance of at least one person in each family to aid the construction worker with the completion of the bathroom. Lastly, each family will be responsible for purchasing and preparing the food for those doing the manual labor.

The project will benefit about 75 people, consisting of the participating women and their families.

To see a video of Carroll’s work on latrines in the community, CLICK HERE.

$0.00 - The Water Charity portion of this project has now been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Carroll of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by the PCV and/or other projects in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.




We are a 501(c)(3) public charity. If you like the work we are doing, we invite you to make a tax-exempt general donation of any amount.

Please consider making a recurring monthly donation.

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If you want to make a donation for a specific project, please use the Donate button at the bottom of the designated project page.

If you prefer, you can send a check to:

Water Charity
P.O. Box 368
Crestline, CA 92325

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Water Charity Honored

Water Charity Honored by Metropolitan Water District on World Water Day 2010

Water Charity was honored by the Metroplitan Water District and Friends of United Nations on World Water Day 2010 for our work in helping people obtain clean water worldwide.

WHO Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality

The Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality, third edition is now available as one integrated volume incorporating revisions reflected in the First and Second addenda.

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Quotations

Water is the only drink for a wise man.
Henry David Thoreau
US Transcendentalist author (1817 - 1862)