The mission of Water Charity is to implement immediate, efficient, and practical projects around the world to provide safe water and effective sanitation to those in need.


Conclusion of Escuela Mentor de la Excelencia Ruben Dario Water System Project - Nicaragua

Conclusion of Escuela Mentor de la Excelencia Ruben Dario Water System Project - NicaraguaThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Talia Langman. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to repair the piping supply system and replace the water fountains at the school.

Talia reports:

On November 19, 2012, a meeting was held with the Director and sub-Director of EMERD, parental leaders, and me in order to discuss the plans for repairing the school’s water system. At the end of the meeting, letters were distributed to each student to inform their parents about the project and the need for participatory action in excavating the old pipe system.

From November 20 - 21, approximately 20 parents participated in the excavation process, which would provide the access for the installation of the new piping.

Conclusion of Escuela Mentor de la Excelencia Ruben Dario Water System Project - NicaraguaA break in the work schedule was taken from November 22 - 25 for the Thanksgiving holiday.

On November 26, the Director of EMERD and I traveled with the local Ministry of Health’s vehicle to the nearby municipality of Condega to purchase supplies for the project.

From November 27 - December 6, hired technicians installed the new piping and made improvements to the water fountains.

On December 7, the parents who had excavated the old pipe system returned to fill in the excavation with dirt.

The water system was officially inaugurated at the sixth grade graduation ceremony on December 11.

We are grateful to Talia for completing this project, and again wish to thank the Paul Bechtner Foundation for providing the funding.

Bendikwai Rainwater Harvesting and Storage Project - Suriname

Bendikwai Rainwater Harvesting and Storage Project - SurinameLocation
Bendikwai, Upper Suriname River, Sipaliwini District, Suriname

Community Description
Bendikwai is a small Sarramaccan village, on the Upper Suriname River in the rainforest of Suriname, consisting of 100 to 120 permanent and semi-permanent residents (about half of which are children).

Income in Bendikwai is generated through agricultural activities. Other sources of income include hunting and woodcarving. Many people only have enough money for food, clothing, shelter, and sending children to school.

The community currently has limited amenities and is especially limited in clean drinking and cooking water sources year round. Drinking contaminated water causes waterborne illnesses such as giardia and diarrhea in the community. The illnesses are common, and are especially rough on community members during the 4-month dry season (September, October, November, and December). In addition, they are costly because work and school days are lost.

Bendikwai Rainwater Harvesting and Storage Project - SurinameProject Description
This project is to provide every man, woman, and child in Bendikwai with a sustainable source of clean drinking and cooking water year round through the harvesting of rainwater and storage in tanks.

The project will be implemented under the direction of the Bendikwai Water Committee, consisting of two men and two women who are active in the community, in collaboration with Peace Corps Volunteer Caroline Horlacher.

The project will consist of 45 400-gallon durotanks for water storage, each with an accompanying system for capture of rainwater. The installations will be placed around the village according to population.

Each 400-gallon tank will allow two people each to drink or cook with 4.5 liters of water per person per day during the 120-day dry season. The water will not require purification.

Bendikwai Rainwater Harvesting and Storage Project - SurinameEach installation will consist of a cement stand upon which the tank is placed, together with a small zinc-covered structure, gutters, and piping to capture runoff.

The community will contribute all labor for the durotank installations and lumber for the durotank houses. The villagers are also responsible for maintenance of the installations.

Project funds will be used for the purchase of the tanks and materials, including zinc, hardware, and cement. They will also pay for transport from the capital of Paramaribo.

Trainings will be conducted by Caroline, in coordination with the committee members, to ensure sustainability. They will consist of water and sanitation hygiene, water conservation, and maintenance of the installations.

Project Impact
The entire population of 120 people, consisting of 20 adult men, 40 adult women, 25 boys, and 35 girls, will benefit from access to clean drinking water.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Caroline Horlacher

Comments
The project is essential for the community to have safe and readily accessible water available during the dry season, and to reduce the incidence of waterborne illness.

Funding
Water Charity is participating in this large effort in cooperation with the Peace Corps Partnership Program.

The Water Charity participation in this project to date has been fully funded through the generosity of the Paul Bechtner Foundation.

We are still seeking additional donations to increase the scope and reach of the project.

In the event sufficient funds are not donated to accomplish the entire project objective, the project will be scaled down to a number of installations in conformance with the funds raised.

Any contributions in excess of the amount of the project will be allocated to other projects directed by Caroline and/or projects of other PCVs in Suriname.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

CEM de Toubacouta Well and Latrine Project – Senegal

CEM de Toubacouta Well and Latrine Project – SenegalLocation
Toubacouta, Fatick, Senegal, West Africa

Community Description
Toubacouta resides 30 km from the border of The Gambia and sits on the edge of the Delta Du Saloum River. Although primarily known as a touristic destination, the population is home to an estimated 6,000 people, but with the surrounding smaller villages approximately 9,000 people.

The main economic driver for Toubacouta is tourism, with two large hotels and numerous smaller hostels. Currently, the majority of the vegetables that are being used at the hotels are imported from Dakar, the capital over 250 km away. Although they cannot buy everything they need from Toubacouta, many vegetables and fruits can still be bought locally.

The majority of Toubacouta has access to running water and electricity. However, because of its unique location the tap water is too salty to drink or water agricultural crops. All of the drinking water is either sold through boutiques or is carted by donkey chariots from other wells in smaller villages.

CEM de Toubacouta Well and Latrine Project – SenegalThe town is fairly large, with two primary schools and one college, CEM de Toubacouta. There are an estimated 900 students who attend this school but have been having issues with teacher strikes and generally raising funds for supplies.

CEM de Toubacouta is the only middle school within a surrounding 5km. Because of the strikes and the lack of maintenance, 10 out of 14 of the latrines for the students are unusable, leaving only 4 latrines functioning.

Project Description
This project at the school has two components. The first is to build a well to provide drinking water for the children, and sufficient water to start a community garden. The second is to renovate the broken latrines.

Well: The well will be 10 to 15 meters deep (depending on the water table), cement lined, and capped. A pump will be installed using the same technology as used in the successful 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks program, incorporating a rope pump with a half cement lid.

CEM de Toubacouta Well and Latrine Project – SenegalWater Charity funds will pay for the transportation of materials, cement mixture, rebar, labor for the cement lining, as well as building the well cap and pump.

The well will be located within the school to provide drinking water for the students. It also will provide water for a school garden, in order to be able to farm local produce to sell to the hotels. This will hopefully give much needed income to the school and also be more cost- effective for the hotels and restaurants in the area.

An experienced well digger, with the assistance of the Peace Corps Volunteer and his local counterpart, will dig the well.

All the materials will be transported to the school and the well will be cemented and lined. Finally the well cap and pump will be installed.

Latrines: There are 10 latrines that are in need of repair. Six of these latrines are in a building south of the school, and the other 4 are located on the northern end by their fields.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase cement, latrine pits, faucets, piping, and PVC piping for the septic tank.

The broken latrines will be removed and the damage to the other latrines will be assessed.

A trench will be dug in order to bring water from the current line to the northern building, an estimated 30-40 meters.

The faucets and piping will then be connected to the building and the new latrines will be cemented in. A flushing kettle will be placed in each of the latrines.

The labor for the plumbing installation and the latrines will be paid for by Water Charity, but the community and students will help remove latrines, and help dig the trench needed to install the water.

An education component will provide information about hygiene and sanitation for the students and staff.

Project Impact
Well: By building the well 900 students will have access to clean drinking water. The school will be able to start the process of a school garden, and can be capable of raising money to reduce student tuitions, pay the teachers, and buy needed supplies.

Latrines: The renovation of the bathrooms will provide 900 students and teacher the ease and access to public toilets. It will give them hygienic conditions, and reduce the number of breaks in the teaching process.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Robert Rivera

The major portion of this project, in the amount of $700, has been funded through the generosity of the Fundación para la Educación y el Desarrollo Transpersonal, of Madrid, Spain. Additional funding has been received from friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer Robert Rivera.

Please continue to donate for this project by clicking on the Donate button below.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 31 - Saare Bidji, Community Well

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 31 - Saare Bidji, Community WellThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Saare Bidji, Kolda, Senegal

Community Description
On the outskirts of Kolda sits a small, one runway airport. Behind the airport, down a sandy bush path, which parallels a string of electrical poles, nestled in into a plethora of trees is Saare Bidji. Each plane that flies over Saare Bidji is a wondrous event as the children run to the fields to get a more clear view of the metal horse of the sky. Their gigantic smiles transition to excited screams, “abion, abion”, which is supposed to be avion, the French word for plane.

Saare Bidji is home to about 1,000 people, and many more non-residents flow through during the year to either work in the school or in the fields. Saare Bidji is the capitol of its Rural Community, which is composed of 300 other villages ranging from 50 to 500 people per village. As the capitol, Saare Bidji owns a school, a health post, multiple government offices, and a home belonging to the president of the whole Rural Community.

Project Description
The president of the Rural Community built a well last year that is used by 60 families for all their daily water needs. We will install an Erobon Rope Pump, which will help these families pull more water in less time.

Project Impact
60 families, approximately 480 men, women, and children, will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Marcie Todd and Adrian Martinez

Comments

Dollar Amount of Project
$150.00

Donations Collected to Date
$150.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of Autumn Staats, of Blackwood, NJ, USA.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 31 - Saare Bidji, Community Well52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 31 - Saare Bidji, Community Well

Hack and Slash Christmas Special 2012 Supports Water Charity Projects

Hack and Slash Christmas Special 2012It’s that time of year again. Hack and Slash Christmas Special is Baltimore’s most popular Christmas comedy event. This year’s show celebrates their 20th anniversary, and promises to be more entertaining than ever. The show is set in the theme of a grand movie premiere, with the live stage show taking the form of a classic holiday movie.

The show will run Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, December 14-16, 2012, at the Chesapeake Arts Center, Baltimore, MD.

The product of John Davis (Hack) and Spencer Humm (Slash), the show features great entertainers providing holiday entertainment for the entire family.

Hack & Slash, in the generosity of the season, have committed to sponsoring four Water Charity Projects:

We are grateful for their continued support, and for their acknowledgement of the Water Charity mission to provide water and sanitation to all those in need all over the world.

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 30 - Toubacouta, Community Garden Well

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 7 - Keur AndallahThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Garrison Harward. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

Garrison reports:

This is our last Toubacouta area pump, and of course with the finish line in sight things couldn’t possibly just go according to plan. Well, mainly they did, with the exception of two work days being interrupted because of the last rains of the season.

We started preparations for this pump back in September and right before we were about to bring out the cement and start casting the cap, the sky opened up like I’ve never seen before. It was the single biggest rainstorm of the season and as such it pushed our start date off another two weeks.

During our second attempt, it also rained, but this time we waited it out and were able to get the work done! We came back 5 days later for the install, and like clockwork, everything clicked. Lamine made his most beautiful pump yet, Paco and his brothers helped out with the heavy lifting and tea making, and I pretty much just watched.

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 7 - Keur AndallahMarcie and I are obsolete in this project now. I could have just supplied the funding and come back two weeks later and the result would have been exactly the same. For Lamine and me, this was our last pump together and this result leaves me with absolute confidence that he will continue as a successful pump specialist for years to come.

Pretty soon all the prep was done and it was time to turn the wheel. Somehow this moment is still suspenseful even after all these pumps. Of course, the pump worked beautifully. Immediately everyone was cheering and drinking from the spout and smiling like they had just won the lottery.

Paco thanked us probably about a thousand times and immediately started planning with Lamine to purchase another pump for the other well. With the vegetables they produce using this pump they should soon have enough money to purchase another one completely on their own. This is how development work should be, a small initial investment that increases capacities and needs not be repeated.

Surely there are problems with dependency from international aid. However, we have found with this project that if you search hard enough and get to know the local environment, you can find those people for whom a contribution will be a catalyst for future growth rather than just a one-time gift.

We are done here in Toubacouta but we leave behind a wonderful resource for motivated farmers to allow them to dream and succeed completely on their own. In time they will forget that Peace Corps ever worked on pumps, and that is exactly how it should be.

Pump Output: 40 Liters/ Min

Total Number of People Benefiting: 45 people

Funder: We again express our sincere gratitude to the Fundación para la Educación y el Desarrollo Transpersonal for providing the funding.

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 7 - Keur AndallahConclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 7 - Keur Andallah

Ponta Baixa Ferro-Cement Tank and Rainwater Catchment Project - Brazil

Ponta Baixa Ferro-Cement Tank and Rainwater Catchment Project - BrazilThis project is to build a rainwater catchment and storage system in Ponta Baixa Village, Itiúba City, Bahia, Brazil.

Itiúba is a town of about 10,000 people in the state of Bahia in the North-East region of Brazil.

Ponta Baixa has 120 families, comprised of 630 inhabitants. It suffers from a lack of an adequate water supply, especially during the dry season.

The project will be implemented by Instituto Diamante Verde (IDV) under the direction of Rosângela Araújo, Vice President. Rosangela previously completed the Gregorio Ferro-Cement Tank and Rainwater Catchment Project – Brazil.

IDV is an active nonprofit in the region, having completed a total of 3 rainwater catchment systems. In addition, they have engaged in a number of environmental, social service, and cultural programs. They also participated in the construction of a school, improvement in the road that gives access to the village, and a new health post.

The project will take place at the Colegio Estadual José Francisco dos Santos. Rainwater will be collected from the school roof, by way of a system of gutters, transported by PVC pipe, and stored in a new ferro-cement tank with a capacity of 40,000 liters. The design also allows for the tank be filled from water trucks when necessary.

A master builder, with experience in this tank technology, will supervise the construction. The residents of the community will provide the labor.

The area for the tank will be cleared, and an iron structure erected. Pre-molded concrete blocks will be fabricated, fitted, and cemented in place. Additional layers of cement will seal and finish the tank. The tank will take about ten days to complete.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the materials, including cement, sand, rebar, sealant, pipe, fittings and fixtures, wire, zinc sheeting, and wood. The money will also be used to pay for the skilled labor.

The remainder of the funds will be contributed by IDV, which has already raised about $1,000 for the project.

The water will be used for drinking and cooking at the school. For safety, it will be treated with sodium hypochlorite, provided by the municipality

The project will benefit all of the families of Ponta Baixa, most directly those that have children at the school and those that live in the houses nearby.

To see additional pictures and information about the project, CLICK HERE.

This project has been fully funded through the generosity of the Paul Bechtner Foundation.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 30 - Toubacouta, Community Garden Well

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 30 - Toubacouta, Community Garden WellThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Toubacouta, Fatick, Senegal

Community Description
Toubacouta is a beautiful Mandinkan village located right on the Sin Saloum Delta. People here are mainly farmers and fishermen, but due to the beauty of the area there is also a substantial tourist industry, with several large hotels providing employment for a large number of local residents.

This influx of tourists and money has its downside however, mainly in that more and more people are turning to commercial work, or work in larger cities, rather than subsistence farming. This is usually beneficial, but less so when the economy slumps and tourism wanes.

Many people are thus left caught between two worlds. They see the possibility of, and want, a modern western life but are left without the means to attain it, and end up turning somewhat reluctantly to agriculture to survive. This reluctance often results in mediocre yields and little forward progress.

Project Description
That being said, this is not the case today. These problems are real, but as often as they arise, there are individuals who rise to the occasion with real enthusiasm and ambition. Meet Paco Diadhiou. He and his family live in Toubacouta, and recently took out a substantial loan and signed a contract to produce mangoes and papayas for export to Europe. This entire family has been farming for generations and they see it not as a fall back, but as their road to prosperity. They are incredibly hardworking and ambitious and are always eager to try new technologies or techniques.

We plan to install a pump on one of their two wells, in order to help them increase their vegetable production in the garden. This will provide them with a steady stream of cash and food while they wait for the trees to start producing.

Project Impact
15 direct family members will benefit from the pump, as well as 30 other local women who work small individual plots in the garden.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Garrison Harward

Comments
The increased productivity afforded by the pump will serve to highlight the technology, and act as a model for others to emulate. With each successful installation, the technicians refine the technique and gain in experience.

Dollar Amount of Project
$150.00

Donations Collected to Date
$150.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of the Fundación para la Educación y el Desarrollo Transpersonal, of Madrid, Spain.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Escuela Mentor de la Excelencia Ruben Dario Water System Project - Nicaragua

Escuela Mentor de la Excelencia Ruben Dario Water System Project - NicaraguaPueblo Nuevo is the municipal capital of the municipality Pueblo Nuevo, located in the northern department of Estelí, Nicaragua, and directly borders the department of Madriz, Nicaragua. The entire municipality consists of around 23,000 individuals.

The municipality contains fifty seven schools, 9 health centers (8 of which are smaller posts located in rural communities), a police station, a mayor’s office and an NGO that works to promote children’s health.

Most of Pueblo Nuevo’s inhabitants are involved in agriculture as a livelihood. The main crops grown are coffee, tomatoes, corn, beans, sorghum and tobacco.

The urban center is located 13 KM from the Pan-American Highway. It consists of approximately 3,000 inhabitants and is surrounded by 50 rural communities.

Escuela Mentor de la Excelencia Ruben Dario is a primary school that is located in Pueblo Nuevo’s urban center. The school teaches grades 1-6, with 339 students in attendance.

Currently, the school has potable running water which can be accessed through various fountains on the campus. However, because of damaged piping there is constant leakage of water on the school grounds. This not only saturates the school property with unnecessary pools of standing water, but has led to water encroachment onto the nearby neighborhood of Guillermo Ramirez.

Escuela Mentor de la Excelencia Ruben Dario Water System Project - NicaraguaThe presence of standing water at the school, coupled with a six month long rainy season, has led to a situation that allows the rapid breeding of the A. Aegypti mosquito, which is the mosquito responsible for the transmittal of Dengue virus through daytime bites. This will often result in an infectious tropical illness in humans known as Dengue fever that manifests clinically with headache, muscle and joint pains, and a characteristic skin rash that is similar to measles.

In a small proportion of cases the disease develops into the life-threatening Dengue hemorrhagic fever, resulting in bleeding, a low blood platelet level and blood plasma leakage, or into Dengue shock syndrome, where dangerously low blood pressure occurs. As Dengue fever is viral, there is currently no cure, and only supportive measures can be taken for treatment.

In 2012, Pueblo Nuevo’s health center reported an increased number of Dengue fever cases from 2011. This has led to increased surveillance, in the hope of eliminating the potential for A. Aegypti breeding in the municipality through the implementation of sanitation campaigns.

This project will repair the current piping system using pipes that are made of Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) technology. In addition, the current water fountains will be replaced with newer and improved models.

The project is being carried out under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Talia Langman.

The work will be done in collaboration with hired skilled laborers, the Nicaraguan Ministry of Education (MINED) and community volunteers such as parents of the school children. Additionally, the Nicaraguan Water and Sewerage Enterprise (ENACAL) will contribute to the project through the donation of ½” PVC piping.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase materials, including the pipe, fittings, and fixtures, as well as small washing stations. In addition project funds will pay for some of the skilled labor.

753 people will directly benefit from the project, including 339 school children and 414 inhabitants of the Guillermo Ramirez neighborhood.

$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of the Paul Bechtner Foundation.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Talia of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Talia and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

Escuela Mentor de la Excelencia Ruben Dario Water System Project - NicaraguaEscuela Mentor de la Excelencia Ruben Dario Water System Project - Nicaragua

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 29 – Sippo, Community Garden Well

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 29 – Sippo, Community Garden WellThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Garrison Harward. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

Garrison reports:

This was by far the most fun I have had installing a rope pump. Firstly, taking a boat through the mangroves to get to the site just sets everything up to feel like an adventure. The villagers were enthusiastic and welcoming, the weather was beautiful and everything went just about as perfectly as it could possibly go.

We started the process like usual with the well cap. We were initially really worried because the sunny morning quickly turned into massive thunderstorms and our cement got caught in the rain. Luckily the clouds parted and we were able to just mix it up really quickly before it set.

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 29 – Sippo, Community Garden WellWe came back a week later for the install, and apart from some logistical problems with catching our boat (we were at the wrong dock), everything went off without a hitch. Lamine, the Toubacouta producer, took charge of everything. He organized the village, mounted the pump, glued the pipe, and threaded the rope. We mostly just sat around taking pictures. This might sound like laziness but in reality we just weren’t needed, and that’s exactly how it should be. Lamine has become a fantastic producer and an expert on this system. He knows it inside and out, can troubleshoot just about any problem, and keeps making improvements to the design with every pump.

Less than an hour after we started the install, we were done, and as you can see, this pump is one of our most efficient ever.

The village thanked us in the usual fashion, handshakes, invitations for lunch and tea, and of course a promise to come and visit each other in the future. As we were leaving, Lamine said we needed to make one stop at another person’s house. It turns out that he had sold a pump to an individual household on the island and it was having some problems. He quickly made a few adjustments and then it was working great once again. This little tune up was free of charge. That’s just the kind of guy Lamine is. He’s also the kind of guy who wears a Winnie the Pooh hat.

Pump Output: 43 Liters/ Min

Total Number of People Benefiting: All 35 women who work in the garden along with their families will benefit from increased watering capacities.

Funder: Ricky Olson.

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 29 – Sippo, Community Garden WellConclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 29 – Sippo, Community Garden Well




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Water Charity Honored

Water Charity Honored by Metropolitan Water District on World Water Day 2010

Water Charity was honored by the Metroplitan Water District and Friends of United Nations on World Water Day 2010 for our work in helping people obtain clean water worldwide.

WHO Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality

The Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality, third edition is now available as one integrated volume incorporating revisions reflected in the First and Second addenda.

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Quotations

Water is the only drink for a wise man.
Henry David Thoreau
US Transcendentalist author (1817 - 1862)