The mission of Water Charity is to implement immediate, efficient, and practical projects around the world to provide safe water and effective sanitation to those in need.


Conclusion of Huabalito and La Botella Bathroom Project – Peru

Conclusion of Huabalito and La Botella Bathroom Project – PeruThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Matthew Fuller. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project was to construct dry ecological bathrooms at households in the villages.

Matthew reports:

All bathrooms in the project (19 in total) are built, but we’re making some minor repairs with leftover funds. The final phase of the construction and the monitoring of the bathrooms are currently being led by Jake Silverman, who replaced me in November 2011. I’m still in Peru with the Peace Corps, working as the volunteer coordinator for the WATSAN program.

We started with 25 families in September 2010, and finished the health talks in March 2011 with 22 families completing this health education and promotion portion of the program. During that time, we were meeting with families at their homes on a bi-weekly basis to check in with them, and see what changes were actually occurring in the household.

During the program, 15 (out of 22 families) consistently had tippy taps up with soap nearby. The biggest change was evident in households with infants or toddlers – these were families that improved in all aspects of hygiene in the house. For water treatment, many families reported boiling water before drinking it, but we couldn’t readily validate this, although two families adopted SODIS method of water treatment.

Conclusion of Huabalito and La Botella Bathroom Project – PeruThe roll-out of the dry composting bathrooms took a lot longer, largely due to waiting over 6 months for the Municipality to come through on their end with the financing. Thankfully, we had the funds from Water Charity to start the construction to keep people motivated and also be able to show off how cool the bathrooms are!

Water Charity funds roughly covered the cost of materials and labor for two dry bathrooms (bricks, cement, rebar, specialized toilet seat, skilled labor) alongside family contributions. Families that showed the most progress and interest were offered the opportunity to be the first to have their bathrooms if they were able to have their own contribution ready – roughly 250 large adobe blocks and over 1 m3 of sand for cement work.

Our first family, the Tantaleon Loje reported that other people in the community joked at them for taking time to prepare the adobes (roughly 2 full days of work) and haul sand from the river base (at least ½ days work). However, they persevered and had faith in the project and understood the benefits of having a bathroom for them and their 5 young boys.

The second family, Amaya Namoc, opened their own general store while the bathroom was being constructed. Once finished, I came back a week later and saw that they had installed a hand washing station (Tippy Tap bottle, soap, towel, and a tub underneath) and a toilet paper dispenser in the bathroom without being prompted to! These bathrooms also served as models for the other community members to understand better the final product when the municipality funds came through.

As of writing, both families have been using and maintaining their bathrooms for over 10 months (alongside others who had bathrooms installed with help from the district municipality)! In a few months, the first batch of compost will be ready to use. But more importantly, it gives these families and their children access to neglected necessities and an opportunity at healthier living and growth! Thanks for all your support, Water Charity!

We in turn extend our thanks to Matthew for completing this project, and wish Jake the best in moving this model project forward. We again extend our gratitude to The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust for providing the funding.

Conclusion of Huabalito and La Botella Bathroom Project – PeruConclusion of Huabalito and La Botella Bathroom Project – Peru
Conclusion of Huabalito and La Botella Bathroom Project – PeruConclusion of Huabalito and La Botella Bathroom Project – Peru

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 23 - Nema Bah, Pump Repair

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 23 - Nema Bah, Pump Repair This project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteers Garrison Harward and Erica Berlin. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to repair 3 pumps in the community.

Garrison reports:

As you can see from the pictures, these pumps are a lot bulkier than ours. As the Senegalese would say, they have a lot of “baggage”. Because of this, repairing them turned out to be quite a bit more expensive than anticipated. As a result we are splitting this into two pumps so pump number 24 will be the second half of these repairs.

We know it’s not always as glamorous to pay for repairs, but this way we get three pumps up and working for the price of two new ones. Still a good deal. Enjoy the post!

We are now fully into the rainy season so pump installs are a little less certain than before. The initial day that we planned to fix the three pumps had to be canceled due to a massive thunderstorm. The rescheduled date started out very cloudy and ominous as well but we decided to just cross our fingers and go for it.

We started by taking out all of the broken parts and replacing as many as we could. This was difficult due to everything being cemented in place or excessively bolted together with now very rusted bolts. This made a simple morning repair job into an all-day affair with multiple welders working. We replaced ropes, PVC pipe, bolts, ball bearings, cement, and greased everything up so it ran more efficiently.

By about mid-day, we were done with the first pump and it was running beautifully. We’ll talk about the other two in the next post. Due to this being the rainy season, the leaders of the group were out in the field and weren’t able to come see the repairs. We’re going to come back though once the work calms down a little to explain the repairs and make sure they know who to contact in the future for other problems.

Pump Output: 35 Liters/Min

Total Number of People Benefiting: 75 women and girls

Funder: Husain Rasheed, dedicated to Parveen Rasheed

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 23 - Nema Bah, Pump RepairConclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 23 - Nema Bah, Pump Repair

Conclusion of Antsikory Well Project – Madagascar

Conclusion of Antsikory Well Project – MadagascarThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Maya Rao. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project was to build two wells for public use by the community, and to carry out health education targeted at mothers and children concerning proper hygiene, sanitation and disease prevention.

Maya reports:

The project’s goals were to improve access to clean water and to decrease the prevalence of diarrheal diseases and schistosomiasis in the community of Antsikory, especially among children.

The objectives of the project were to build two wells, and to train the community on proper hygiene and other preventative measures against diarrheal diseases and schistosomiasis.

The community successfully met the objectives of the project, as the two wells were completed and the community leaders were trained on proper hygiene practices and strategies for avoiding water borne illnesses and basic treatment for people with diarrheal diseases. With this knowledge and improved access to clean water, the community is now empowered to reduce the risk for water borne disease outbreaks.

Conclusion of Antsikory Well Project – MadagascarThrough the collaborative work of the Antsikory and Antsirabe Nord women’s groups, the partnership, cooperation and communication between the two organizations has been strengthened, thereby encouraging women’s groups in neighboring communities to work together.

Community leaders and members of the Antsikory women’s group (30 women and 20 men) acquired health and hygiene skills, such as handwashing and methods of cleaning water, to help prevent against diarrhea and schistosomiasis by attending the health training with the PCV. They will hopefully pass on the information to the rest of the community.

Through the process of seeking and collecting funds and purchasing materials for the well project, women’s groups further developed money management and fundraising skills as well as a sense of ownership and responsibility for the two community wells.

A group of five people living adjacent to each of the wells has been appointed by the Antsikory women’s group to monitor the well usage and ensure the cleanliness and longevity of the wells. Those responsible have a key to the well covers, and will unlock the covers in the morning and close the covers at night to reduce the chance of contamination and to prevent against theft and defacement of the wells at night.

The Antsikory women’s group will contact with the Antsirabe Nord women’s group if in need of assistance gathering additional funds for future repairs and maintenance of the wells. The wells however do come with a one year guarantee from the well builders. Any necessary repairs within the first year will be free of charge.

We are grateful to Maya for completing this project, and again wish to thank The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust for providing the funds for the Water Charity participation in the project.

Conclusion of Antsikory Well Project – MadagascarConclusion of Antsikory Well Project – Madagascar

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 23 - Nema Bah, Pump Repair

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 23 - Nema Bah, Pump RepairThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Nema Bah, Fatick, Senegal

Community Description
Nema Bah is a medium-sized village of about 800 people. Their main source of income comes from agriculture but is also subsidized by fishing and family members working in larger cities. Situated right on the Delta, the village is beautiful, surrounded by mangroves and with lots dedicated and hard-working farmers who are making great progress towards improving their lives.

There are three separate community gardens just outside the village, as most people garden here. Even before Peace Corps came to this site they had already started utilizing many of the improved techniques that we teach, such as composting, mulching for water conservations, and using organic natural solutions for pest management. They’re seriously innovative!

We first came to this village a year and a half ago when we were first developing our improved rope pump system. They have 6 rope pumps in this space installed by the NGO that founded the group. They work pretty well but they’re very bulky and not easily repaired.

Project Description
Like every piece of equipment these pumps eventually developed problems and because they weren’t easy to fix they ended up just sitting there becoming increasingly less functional until they stopped working all together. The last time we went to the village the president of the group brought this up to us and asked if there was anything we could do to help. They didn’t even bat an eye when we said they would have to raise money for part of the repairs; they just wanted to get it done.

The plan here is to take the three broken pumps and replace all of their respective broken parts and tune them up until they work again. We will also connect the group to our pump producer in Toubacouta so if they have any future problems they can fix them on their own.

This is the link that was previously missing. It’s not enough to just give someone a fancy piece of equipment. They need to have a way to maintain it in order for it to really be useful in the long run.

Project Impact
75 Women and girls who work in the garden will benefit from these pumps.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Garrison Harward and Erica Berlin

Comments
This project re-asserts the importance of building sustainability into development projects. The knowledge and information that is passed on is as important as the piece of equipment left behind. It also shows that you can repair nonfunctional equipment for a fraction of the cost of building it from scratch.

Dollar Amount of Project
$150.00

Donations Collected to Date
$150.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Husain Rasheed, of Galena, OH, USA, and dedicated to Parveen Rasheed.

If you now contribute $150 (our new price, which includes labor), your name will be placed on the waiting list to adopt the next project in order.

If you wish to contribute less than $150, the money will be applied toward the overall program.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 23 - Nema Bah, Pump Repair52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 23 - Nema Bah, Pump Repair

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of Ndvwabangeni Dam Project – Swaziland

Conclusion of Ndvwabangeni Dam Project – SwazilandThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Melissa Lin. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project was to construct a scoop dam as a means to alleviate the water shortage. Melissa was unable to finish the project before her Close of Service, and the project was passed on to Peace Corps Volunteer Shauna Biggs.

Shauna reports:

The original project goals and objectives were to build a scoop dam where family and community gardens could be started, and developing a constant source of water in an area that is harshly affected by water shortages. By creating a new and reliable water source, they would directly be improving the livelihood of the community members and generate food security.

After the start of the project, three revisions and conditions were agreed on by the community. The first was to set a fixed date for completion. The second made it the responsibility of the water committee and inner council to move the project forward, hold weekly meetings, and organize all tasks needed to accomplish the project. Lastly, it was the responsibility of the community to store and keep safe all materials and supplies. Thereafter, it would be the responsibility of the community to complete the dam.

The inner council and water committee accomplished the three conditions. All of the materials have been procured ant put into storage. What remains is for Land Development to bulldoze the area and initiate the construction of the dam.

The participants had to overcome numerous obstacles and take steps to work toward completion. These included energizing the local organizations to take charge of the project, obtaining the necessary political support, and securing the allocation from the government for the use of the use of a bulldozer.

We are grateful to Melissa for starting this project and to Shauna to seeing it through to its conclusion. We also again wish to thank The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust for providing the funding.

Conclusion of Ndvwabangeni Dam Project – SwazilandConclusion of Ndvwabangeni Dam Project – Swaziland

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 22 - Thiewol Lao, Master Farm – Conclusion

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 22 - Thiewol Lao, Master Farm – ConclusionThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd, Mary Cadwallender and David Gloveski. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

Marcie reports:

The Thiewol Lao pump was the first difficult pump we’ve had in quite a while. The first time we tried to install the pump the technician accidentally grabbed the wrong size rope. The second time we went to install we realized the mason had cemented the opening a little out of place. This doesn’t sound like a big deal, but the two centimeters the hole was off made it impossible to fit the piping correctly. Both times we drove the hour and a half back to Kolda in a sullen mood. As the say, “the third time’s a charm”. We brought the mason, the right rope, and higher spirits, and finally got the job done right.

May in Kolda is a consistent 110 degrees making people lethargic and irritable. Everyone does their work in the early morning and spends the whole rest of the afternoon under a cool tree, drenched in sweat. It is not common for folks to tend a garden during the months of April, May and June, which means that the prices of veggies skyrocket. Gano takes advantage of the high price of veggies and works hard in his garden. He’s got it down pat and harvests right when the prices are at their highest.

The pump installation will surely help Gano water more efficiently so that when the heat of the day comes he can rest.

Pump Output: 39 Liters/ Min

Total Number of People Benefiting: 12

Funder: Paul Jackson

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 22 - Thiewol Lao, Master Farm – Conclusion52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 22 - Thiewol Lao, Master Farm – Conclusion

Conclusion of Antanandava, Anamboafo, and Marolamba Well Project - Madagascar

Conclusion of Antanandava, Anamboafo, and Marolamba Well Project - MadagascarThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Rowan Braybrook. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project, which was designed to build three wells in different communities in northern Madagascar, exceeded expectations.

Rowan reports:

This project resulted in the development of 6 wells in the commune of Anjangoveratra, district of Sambava, northern Madagascar.

The three towns that received wells are located next to the Missouri Botanical Garden's (MBG's) new Makirovana Forest reserve. This gives additional environmental importance to well construction, as changing water sources will reduce forest incursions, erosion, and runoff.

The financial support encouraged the NGOs ARES and MBG to match the original funding and double the number of wells built.

Conclusion of Antanandava, Anamboafo, and Marolamba Well Project - MadagascarThe towns of Antanandava, Anamboafo, and Marolamba have a total population of 3,419 and went from having zero wells to having six, two in each town, giving each community close to full clean water coverage.

Two of the wells were installed at area schools, and use by residents is high.

In addition to housing and feeding workers, gathering local materials (sand and gravel), and transporting well materials, several community members assisted the well builders at each well throughout the construction process, giving them the construction skills needed to clean and repair the wells when needed.

The community has appointed two guardians for each well who lock up the well cover at night and monitor use.

We are grateful to Rowan for completing the project and to The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust and Positive H2O (+H2O) for providing the funding.

Conclusion of Antanandava, Anamboafo, and Marolamba Well Project - MadagascarConclusion of Antanandava, Anamboafo, and Marolamba Well Project - Madagascar

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 22 - Thiewol Lao, Master Farm

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 22 - Thiewol Lao, Master Farm This project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Lao, Kolda, Senegal

Community Description
Off of a dusty dirt road an hour and a half from the city is a bustling small town called Thiewol Lao. From the outset one may not think anything special of the place, but once one mounts the hill they see nothing but green on either side on the decline. This is a feat in the hot season months.

Thiewol Lao is one of the 4 Master Farmer sites in Kolda. A master farmer receives instruction, funding, and ongoing support from Peace Corps Volunteers and Staff to develop one hectare of farmland into a demonstration plot. They display best practices with field crops, gardening, fruit trees, and natural resource management. The manifest success of these combined practices on one farm by an enthusiastic Senegalese farmer create an effective demonstration and inspiration for other farmers to adapt the practices as well.

Gano is a very successful master farmer and has absorbed all of the best practices. Even in the heart of hot season he is out working his garden and has high yields as proof of his success. Though he is the owner of the farm, his accomplishments are not solely his own to claim. His wife and children work just as hard and when one watches their work there is nothing to feel but hope for the future. Those in Thiewol Lao speak highly of Gano and what they have learned from his training days. Many of the women now use compost in their own gardens.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 22 - Thiewol Lao, Master Farm Project Description
We are installing a rope pump on one of the wells at the demonstration site. The well connects to 3 basins via PVC pipe. There is a small basin attached to the well where one drains water that then flows to the other 3 basins. The water pump will make the basins fill a bit faster with less effort.

Project Impact
12 men, women and children will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Marcie Todd, Mary Cadwallender and David Gloveski

Comments
The installation of the pump will not only help directly with Gano’s garden but will be proliferated through his passing on of the technology as part of his teaching effort.

Dollar Amount of Project
$150.00

Donations Collected to Date
$150.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Paul Jackson, of Worcestershire, United Kingdom.

Paul was cameraman and editor of the great video produced by Claudio Von Planta that features Water Charity, filmed at the Water/Wo/Men event in the Maldives.

If you now contribute $150 (our new price, which includes labor), your name will be placed on the waiting list to adopt the next project in order.

If you wish to contribute less than $150, the money will be applied toward the overall program.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 22 - Thiewol Lao, Master Farm52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 22 - Thiewol Lao, Master Farm

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of Dassa Family Latrine Project - Benin

Conclusion of Dassa Family Latrine Project - BeninThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Brigitte Pohren. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project was to construct 25 pit latrines for low-income families in the community. Although there were delays, and the number of latrines had to be reduced, the project was a huge success.

Brigitte reports:

The goal of the project was to improve the hygiene and sanitation of the community through construction of 25 family latrines, thereby reducing the incidence of preventable fecal-related illnesses. The families were chosen through a survey produced by the PCV and members of the NGO.

To be eligible for the project, each family agreed to the following:

  • Subscribe to yearly trash collection and make monthly payments.
  • Collect gravel, sand, and water for the cement mixture,
  • Dig a 3 m hole.
  • Provide the initial mason payment.
  • Build the latrine superstructure.
  • Provide space for the construction (minimum of 15 m between latrine and nearest water source).

The project began in January, 2011, and was not finished until April, 2012. The delay was due to weather, family participation, mason availability, cement access, and cost increases.

Benin experienced a particularly long rainy season, during which digging had to be suspended and the masons were not able to line the pits.

Some families discontinued the project due to family matters and the delays.

Mason availability became a problem when it was determined that there were only 3 masons available in the community who had been trained in the design of this type of latrine. Dividing the work and scheduling the labor presented a problem. A major problem was acquisition of the needed cement. A major cement factory went bankrupt, causing cement shortages throughout the country and a resultant increase in price.

In the end, the goals and objectives of the project were met, although only 20 latrines were completed.

Through project training sessions, all participants learned the basics of latrine construction, the benefits of latrine usage, as well as the essentials of latrine maintenance.

Project participants are expected to help spread the information on low-cost latrines to other families in need of hygiene and sanitation assistance, and the program is expected to continue.

We are grateful to Brigitte for completing this project, and again wish to thank The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust for providing the funding.

Conclusion of Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The Gambia

Conclusion of Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The GambiaThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Jeremy Mak. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project was designed to secure access to clean water for Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Villages by installing 3 Blue Pumps. Although the beneficiary communities changed over time, the result was another remarkable success.

Jeremy reports:

I want to let you know that three (3) new Dutch Blue Pumps were installed in Choya, Medina Wallom, and Brikama Lefaya. Fairwater's partner, Swe-Gam, installed them.

Fairwater Foundation was able to offer both Si Kunda and Kalikajara only one Blue Pump each to spread the beneficiary area. Although this was clearly stipulated to their village leaders in our initial meeting with them and that they originally agreed and welcomed receiving one hand pump each, the village chiefs declined the pumps. They insisted that they would only accept two pumps each, because they were worried about having a long wait time with just one pump. While I hate leaving communities to draw water from open wells, with such a short time period left, I had no choice but to defer to willing villages, lest I risk losing the three donated Blue Pumps (each valued at more than $2,500).

Conclusion of Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The GambiaWhile I was unable to help Si Kunda and Kalikajara this time, Choya, Medina Wallom, and Brikama Lefaya were each experiencing acute water problems prior to installation of the Blue Pumps. You may recall that in a prior Water Charity project, I rehabilitated Choya's one surviving Mark II pump. But even with that one in working order, with 380 people depending on it, water security was at risk. By supplying a second and more robust pump, we were able to significantly reduce women's pumping and waiting times.

At Medina Wallom, the whole community depended on one Mark II pump. The Blue Pump replaced the residents' second Mark, which broke down last year, severely affecting their dry season gardening. Now, the community has two pumps on which to rely to grow early season bitter tomato, which is their cash crop.

At Brikama Lefaya, 40 residents relied on one Mark II to supply all their domestic water needs, gardening, and cattle watering. By replacing their Mark with a Blue Pump, the higher water output better enables the community to meet all their water demands. Before, women needing to water their gardens in the evening would have to wait extensively so that the cows could drink.

The beneficiaries of this project are:

  • Choya = 380
  • Medina Wallom = 115
  • Brikama Lefaya = 40

With some leftover funds for new parts and by recycling some old parts from decommissioned Mark II's, I plan to repair four more Mark II hand pumps in the following communities before I leave:

  • Medina Wallom (new handle bearings and axle)
  • Demba Kunda (new handle bearings)
  • Pinai (new handle bearings, new cylinder seals, new pipe seals)
  • Kaani Kunda Suba (new handle bearings, new cylinder seals, replacement chain, replacement handle)

We wish to thank Jeremy for completing this terrific project, and again extend our gratitude to the SLOW LIFE Foundation for providing the funding.

Conclusion of Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The GambiaConclusion of Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The Gambia
Conclusion of Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The GambiaConclusion of Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The Gambia
Conclusion of Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The GambiaConclusion of Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The Gambia




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Water Charity Honored

Water Charity Honored by Metropolitan Water District on World Water Day 2010

Water Charity was honored by the Metroplitan Water District and Friends of United Nations on World Water Day 2010 for our work in helping people obtain clean water worldwide.

WHO Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality

The Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality, third edition is now available as one integrated volume incorporating revisions reflected in the First and Second addenda.

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Quotations

Water is the only drink for a wise man.
Henry David Thoreau
US Transcendentalist author (1817 - 1862)