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52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 30 - Toubacouta, Community Garden Well

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 30 - Toubacouta, Community Garden WellThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Toubacouta, Fatick, Senegal

Community Description
Toubacouta is a beautiful Mandinkan village located right on the Sin Saloum Delta. People here are mainly farmers and fishermen, but due to the beauty of the area there is also a substantial tourist industry, with several large hotels providing employment for a large number of local residents.

This influx of tourists and money has its downside however, mainly in that more and more people are turning to commercial work, or work in larger cities, rather than subsistence farming. This is usually beneficial, but less so when the economy slumps and tourism wanes.

Many people are thus left caught between two worlds. They see the possibility of, and want, a modern western life but are left without the means to attain it, and end up turning somewhat reluctantly to agriculture to survive. This reluctance often results in mediocre yields and little forward progress.

Project Description
That being said, this is not the case today. These problems are real, but as often as they arise, there are individuals who rise to the occasion with real enthusiasm and ambition. Meet Paco Diadhiou. He and his family live in Toubacouta, and recently took out a substantial loan and signed a contract to produce mangoes and papayas for export to Europe. This entire family has been farming for generations and they see it not as a fall back, but as their road to prosperity. They are incredibly hardworking and ambitious and are always eager to try new technologies or techniques.

We plan to install a pump on one of their two wells, in order to help them increase their vegetable production in the garden. This will provide them with a steady stream of cash and food while they wait for the trees to start producing.

Project Impact
15 direct family members will benefit from the pump, as well as 30 other local women who work small individual plots in the garden.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Garrison Harward

Comments
The increased productivity afforded by the pump will serve to highlight the technology, and act as a model for others to emulate. With each successful installation, the technicians refine the technique and gain in experience.

Dollar Amount of Project
$150.00

Donations Collected to Date
$150.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of the Fundación para la Educación y el Desarrollo Transpersonal, of Madrid, Spain.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 29 - Sippo, Community Garden Well

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 29 - Sippo, Community Garden Well This project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Sippo, Fatick, Senegal

Community Description
As you can probably tell by the pictures the village of Sippo is an Island village. It is located about 15 k into the delta off the coast of Toubacouta. The main source of income for the villagers comes from fishing and oyster collection, but they also participate in some small-scale farming and gardening activities. Culturally this is one of the most diverse villages we’ve ever worked in. They have Wolof, Serere, Mandinkan, and Pulaar families all living together in this remote community.

The village is a beautiful oasis surrounded by mangroves and forest located just outside of the Bamboung wildlife reserve. The village contributes to the preservation of the area and helps to run an eco-lodge called Keur Bamboung. If you’re ever in the area check it out. It is one of the true gems of Senegal.

Project Description
Living on an Island is beautiful but it presents certain problems. Everything not directly pulled from the ocean is scarce here. That includes building supplies, medicines, staple foods like rice and millet, and also fruits and vegetables.

There is one women’s garden on the island which provides some food for the village, but production is not very efficient and with only one well, it is difficult to pull enough water for all the women who work there to water their individual plots.

We will be installing a rope pump on this well in order to increase their watering capacities so that they can produce more vegetables, leading to better self-sufficiency on the island.

Project Impact
All 35 women who work in the garden, along with their families, will benefit from increased watering capacities.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Garrison Harward

Comments
This is an important project which will have a significant impact on the health and wellbeing of the people on the island.

Dollar Amount of Project
$150.00

Donations Collected to Date
$150.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of the Ricky Olson, of Deer Park, WI, USA.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 29 - Sippo, Community Garden Well52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 29 - Sippo, Community Garden Well

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 28 - Sare Salamata, Master Farm

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 28 - Sare Salamata, Master FarmThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Salamata, Kolda, Senegal

Community Description
13 k from Kolda along the main pothole-filled road into town lies the larger village of Salemata. There are approximately 1,200 people who live in this highly communicative place.

Salamata has a huge number of women’s groups, youth groups, associations, and garden groups, most of which host weekly meetings. The town itself is highly organized, with soap making projects, beautiful dry season river gardens, wet season field crops, and educational projects.

This year, one of the women’s groups will be working in the Master Farm producing dry season veggies and selling them in the market in Kolda. Being so close to Kolda, Salamata is in a great location to make good money for their crops and labor. As the basic market system goes, food is more expensive in cities.

Many men from Salamata also do day work as drivers and go back to their villages at night.

Saku Omar Mballo owns the Master Farm and acts as the president of the health post. He is a very motivated man with a lot of energy. Though he is not the mayor, when walking about town with him, one is aware of his social and political reach. Everyone in town greets him as they pass and ask him questions about his garden or the health post. They ask about his family and health as he returns the greetings, asking more intimate questions about someone’s sick grandmother or someone’s recent trip to Kolda.

Project Description
The Master Farm is home to improved garden techniques and demonstrations for the average farmer. The demonstrations are usually quick and simple ways to increase one’s crop yields, keep bugs out, and improve one’s soil.

The pump for this Master Farm will help with watering in the dry season and demonstrate a locally made appropriate technology.

Project Impact
11 men, women, and children will directly benefit by being at a training site. Many more will indirectly benefit through the increased yields of the farm.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Missy Ore and Marcie Todd

Comments

Dollar Amount of Project
$150.00

Donations Collected to Date
$0.00

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING $150.00

$150.00 (our new price, which includes labor) will give you "naming rights". You can name it after yourself or your family. You can dedicate it in honor or in memory of someone.

For a $500 donation, your name will be acknowledged on the program page for 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program - Senegal.

If you wish to give a smaller amount, to be applied to the overall program, you may do so.

Any contributions in excess of the Dollar Amount of Project will be allocated to other projects directed by these PCVs and/or projects of other PCVs in Senegal.

Dollar Amount Needed
$150.00

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE. We are still seeking donations.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 28 - Sare Salamata, Master Farm52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 28 - Sare Salamata, Master Farm

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 27 - Sare Samba Diaba

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 27 – Sare Samba DiabaThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Samba Diaba, Kolda, Senegal

Community Description
Sare Samba Diaba is a small village located east of Kolda near the miniature airport. It is lush and full of rich soil. The village loves fruit trees and farms corn, millet, and sorghum during the rainy season. There are very few working and potable wells in town, so many members of the community come to the chief’s well for their water needs.

Samba Diaba is home to about 250 people that the chief says is his job to take care of. This year he has over 1,000 trees in nursery and plan more for the coming year. His master plan is to add a live fence to all of the compounds near the main dirt road in hopes to prevent the massive erosion that runs away every water season. This year, the rains have already destroyed two cornfields and collapsed one well.

Despite the erosion, most people are thankful for the water because it means this year’s harvest will be big. Last year the rain started late and ended early leaving many families without food this year, so the rain is a blessing.

Project Description

The chief’s well is weakly reinforced with a small layer of cement and mud bricks. They use a rubber bag with lots of holes to collect water so that by the time the water rises 17 meters to the top, there is hardly any water in it and human energy gets wasted. We will be reinforcing the well walls and then installing the rope pump in the normal fashion.

Project Impact
82 men, women, and children will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Adrian Martinez and Marcie Todd

Comments
This project will have an immediate impact on the security and wellbeing of the community, and a long-range effect on its ability to meet its needs.

Dollar Amount of Project
$150.00

Donations Collected to Date
$150.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of Susan Smith, of Rockville, MD.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 27 – Sare Samba Diaba52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 27 – Sare Samba Diaba

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 26 - Segou, Community Well

This project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 26 - Segou, Community WellLocation
Segou, Kedougou, Senegal

Community Description
We described the basics about Segou in the last post, so with this one let us delve a little deeper into the individual receiving this pump. Bubacar Diallo is a local farmer with one wife and seven children. He’s the treasurer for the eco-campement and is passionate about promoting eco-tourism in his and surrounding villages. He originally worked with David and the previous Segou volunteer when they first came to do pumps in his village and was very excited about the system, saying that he wanted to start a personal garden once he had easier access to water.

His pump was the one that our group of volunteers installed during our pump training with David and as you can see he could have certainly made a nice garden. Unfortunately though, the well that the pump was on collapsed and he never ended up moving the pump to another one because the system was a little too complicated and intimidating. He has a well in his personal family compound though, and as soon as he heard we were coming, he enthusiastically asked if we could help him install it there.

With more access to water, he hopes to start his family garden there, which would be an excellent source of both nutrition and extra cash for everyone. This leads to better health, better access to goods and services, and overall more stability for the whole family. The pump should also ease the burden put on the women and girls of the family who currently have to pull water by hand many times a day.

Project Description
Bubacar graciously agreed to install the half well cap ahead of time so we will come in and provide new PVC piping, a rope and a turn block to update it to the new system. The work will be done on the same day as the previous pump, hopefully in time for everyone to get home before lunch!

Project Impact
This pump will directly help the 15 people living in the family compound along with several other families who live nearby.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Garrison Harward, Marcie Todd, and Kyle Deboy

Comments

Dollar Amount of Project
$150.00

Donations Collected to Date
$150.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of Susan Smith, of Rockville, MD.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 26 - Segou, Community Well52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 26 - Segou, Community Well This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 25 - Segou, Eco-Campament Well

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 25 - Segou, Eco-Campament WellThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Segou, Kedougou, Senegal

Community Description
Segou is a small village of about 400 people situated in the southeast of Senegal just above the border with Guinea. The village primarily farms corn because of the rich soil, but also has a lot of fruit trees, especially mangoes, because of the heavy rainfall here in the south of the country. This is a much different environment than we work in over to the west in Kolda or up in the northwest by Toubacouta. Compared to our sites, it’s kind of like being in the Garden of Eden.

Because of the beauty of the area there is an Eco-Campament here that was actually created with the help of a Peace Corps Volunteer. The Campament provides jobs for local villagers and contributes 15% of every stay to the village. It’s really a great thing for everyone.

I have to put in this shameless plug to anyone who might be interested. Here’s the contact info. You won’t be disappointed. Samale Diallo, Tel: 221772337650

We didn’t just come here though to stay in this lovely place. We decided to do pumps all the way out here because this is where it all started. A little over a year ago David Campbell started producing pumps in Kedougou and held a training on their production for other volunteers. This is where Marcie and I learned about pumps and first started planning our project. We came to Segou to see a pump that had previously been installed at this Campament and to install one more with a local farmer.

Project Description
These pumps worked for a while but this original system just wasn’t very efficient and they eventually broke down. The pumps sat idle until now. We plan to go into the village and update both of these pumps to the new system and train new volunteers and the Kedougou pump producer on how they work.

Project Impact
The 10 people who work with the campament will directly benefit along with other families that live close to the well.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Garrison Harward, with Marcie Todd and Kyle Deboy

Comments
As the program heads toward the finish, the methods become refined and the effectiveness becomes evident. Most striking is the amount of education and training that takes place with every new installation.

Dollar Amount of Project
$150.00

Donations Collected to Date
$150.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of Susan Smith, of Rockville, MD.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 25 - Segou, Eco-Campament Well52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 25 - Segou, Eco-Campament Well

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 24 - Nema Bah, Pump Repair Continued

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 24 - Nema Bah, Pump Repair ContinuedThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Nema Bah, Fatick, Senegal

Community Description
As we said before this is the continuation of Pump #23 since we didn’t have enough money from one pump post to make all the necessary repairs for three pumps. This once again illustrates the importance not just of providing technologies to poverty stricken regions of the world, but of providing appropriate technologies that can actually survive in the region. These pumps installed by a very well-meaning NGO are not appropriate for rural Senegalese villages. It has cost us a lot of money to repair them, something that simply would not have happened if we didn’t step in.

Project Description
These pumps then aren’t ideal by any means, and in many ways it would be better for the group if we replaced them with our model. It was important however to show that they can be maintained by a local technician at an affordable rate. Foreign aid has taught people here to wait for outside solutions and gifts. These pumps will show the village that they can do it themselves.

The three pumps we’re working on need complete overhauls. The rest are still functioning and with maintenance shouldn’t ever need this kind of massive repair job. The three we’re working on should be able to function with a little maintenance as well for another 5-10 years by which time, if they so desire, the village can raise the money to purchase new ones from our local source. This is sustainability. It isn’t the most giving solution, but it’s the most effective.

Project Impact
75 Women and girls who work in the garden will benefit from these pumps.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Garrison Harward and Erica Berlin

Comments
This investment will take away the uncertainty when repairs need to be made down the road. Often times when looking at complex technologies, villagers will throw them away rather than try to fix them. That won’t be the case for these pumps.

Dollar Amount of Project
$150.00

Donations Collected to Date
$150.00

$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Jennifer L. Gustafson,of Chico, CA, USA.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Garrison and Marcie of your donation.

Any contributions in excess of the Dollar Amount of Project will be allocated to projects directed by other PCVs in Senegal.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 24 - Nema Bah, Pump Repair Continued52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 24 - Nema Bah, Pump Repair Continued

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 23 - Nema Bah, Pump Repair

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 23 - Nema Bah, Pump RepairThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Nema Bah, Fatick, Senegal

Community Description
Nema Bah is a medium-sized village of about 800 people. Their main source of income comes from agriculture but is also subsidized by fishing and family members working in larger cities. Situated right on the Delta, the village is beautiful, surrounded by mangroves and with lots dedicated and hard-working farmers who are making great progress towards improving their lives.

There are three separate community gardens just outside the village, as most people garden here. Even before Peace Corps came to this site they had already started utilizing many of the improved techniques that we teach, such as composting, mulching for water conservations, and using organic natural solutions for pest management. They’re seriously innovative!

We first came to this village a year and a half ago when we were first developing our improved rope pump system. They have 6 rope pumps in this space installed by the NGO that founded the group. They work pretty well but they’re very bulky and not easily repaired.

Project Description
Like every piece of equipment these pumps eventually developed problems and because they weren’t easy to fix they ended up just sitting there becoming increasingly less functional until they stopped working all together. The last time we went to the village the president of the group brought this up to us and asked if there was anything we could do to help. They didn’t even bat an eye when we said they would have to raise money for part of the repairs; they just wanted to get it done.

The plan here is to take the three broken pumps and replace all of their respective broken parts and tune them up until they work again. We will also connect the group to our pump producer in Toubacouta so if they have any future problems they can fix them on their own.

This is the link that was previously missing. It’s not enough to just give someone a fancy piece of equipment. They need to have a way to maintain it in order for it to really be useful in the long run.

Project Impact
75 Women and girls who work in the garden will benefit from these pumps.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Garrison Harward and Erica Berlin

Comments
This project re-asserts the importance of building sustainability into development projects. The knowledge and information that is passed on is as important as the piece of equipment left behind. It also shows that you can repair nonfunctional equipment for a fraction of the cost of building it from scratch.

Dollar Amount of Project
$150.00

Donations Collected to Date
$150.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Husain Rasheed, of Galena, OH, USA, and dedicated to Parveen Rasheed.

If you now contribute $150 (our new price, which includes labor), your name will be placed on the waiting list to adopt the next project in order.

If you wish to contribute less than $150, the money will be applied toward the overall program.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 23 - Nema Bah, Pump Repair52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 23 - Nema Bah, Pump Repair

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 22 - Thiewol Lao, Master Farm

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 22 - Thiewol Lao, Master Farm This project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Lao, Kolda, Senegal

Community Description
Off of a dusty dirt road an hour and a half from the city is a bustling small town called Thiewol Lao. From the outset one may not think anything special of the place, but once one mounts the hill they see nothing but green on either side on the decline. This is a feat in the hot season months.

Thiewol Lao is one of the 4 Master Farmer sites in Kolda. A master farmer receives instruction, funding, and ongoing support from Peace Corps Volunteers and Staff to develop one hectare of farmland into a demonstration plot. They display best practices with field crops, gardening, fruit trees, and natural resource management. The manifest success of these combined practices on one farm by an enthusiastic Senegalese farmer create an effective demonstration and inspiration for other farmers to adapt the practices as well.

Gano is a very successful master farmer and has absorbed all of the best practices. Even in the heart of hot season he is out working his garden and has high yields as proof of his success. Though he is the owner of the farm, his accomplishments are not solely his own to claim. His wife and children work just as hard and when one watches their work there is nothing to feel but hope for the future. Those in Thiewol Lao speak highly of Gano and what they have learned from his training days. Many of the women now use compost in their own gardens.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 22 - Thiewol Lao, Master Farm Project Description
We are installing a rope pump on one of the wells at the demonstration site. The well connects to 3 basins via PVC pipe. There is a small basin attached to the well where one drains water that then flows to the other 3 basins. The water pump will make the basins fill a bit faster with less effort.

Project Impact
12 men, women and children will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Marcie Todd, Mary Cadwallender and David Gloveski

Comments
The installation of the pump will not only help directly with Gano’s garden but will be proliferated through his passing on of the technology as part of his teaching effort.

Dollar Amount of Project
$150.00

Donations Collected to Date
$150.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Paul Jackson, of Worcestershire, United Kingdom.

Paul was cameraman and editor of the great video produced by Claudio Von Planta that features Water Charity, filmed at the Water/Wo/Men event in the Maldives.

If you now contribute $150 (our new price, which includes labor), your name will be placed on the waiting list to adopt the next project in order.

If you wish to contribute less than $150, the money will be applied toward the overall program.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 22 - Thiewol Lao, Master Farm52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 22 - Thiewol Lao, Master Farm

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 21 - Sincan Samba Koulibaly, Urban Garden

52 Pumps – Senegal – Project 21- Sincan Samba Koulibaly, Urban GardenThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Sincan Samba Koulibaly, Kolda, Senegal

Community Description
Facing the Kolda cotton factory is a quartier called Samba Koulibaly, named after a Malian man who, years before the cotton factory, arrived when there was not even a paved road going through Kolda. Samba Koulibaly’s namesakes will probably remain the chiefs of the quartier until the end of time.

The cotton factory is the largest employer in Kolda, where jobs are among the most secure that one can attain. Although it is only seasonal work, they pay nicely, and one knows that for 5 months there will be a steady income.

Mohamadou Djamanka until recently worked in a factory in Spain where he sent money back to his family. He now owns a boutique facing of the cotton factory where he works every day from 7 am to 11:30 pm, unless it is cotton-processing season. During that time his two wives take turns manning the boutique and he crosses the street to work, clothed from head to toe, ready for the work at hand.

52 Pumps – Senegal – Project 21- Sincan Samba Koulibaly, Urban GardenAll year long Mohamadou’s wives and kids grow vegetables in a small plot near their house. They usually have enough to eat and a bit to sell. They are the definition of urban gardening, here in Kolda.

Many Koldans grow everyday veggies, but many more only grow essential grains like rice, corn, and millet during rainy season. Mohamadou and his family believe they should be saving money on vegetables and growing them themselves.

One day while I was hanging out at Mohamadou’s boutique he showed me the math of the money he was saving each month by gardening in his small plot and it was upwards of $27, which doesn’t sound like a lot, but is.

Project Description
This project is to build a pump at a well that is used to irrigate the plot worked by Mohamadou Djamanka and his family.

52 Pumps – Senegal – Project 21- Sincan Samba Koulibaly, Urban GardenProject Impact
14 men, women, and children will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Marcie Todd

Comments
“The food situation in Senegal and throughout the world is in a dire state. Rising food prices combined with a limited availability of food has led to misery and malnutrition, rapidly hitting the world’s poorest and developing populations the hardest. In Senegal, with nearly half of all families considered “food insecure” by the World Food Program and half the population living in large towns and cities, there is a growing need for individuals and families to produce their own food.”
Peace Corps Senegal, Urban Agriculture Website.

Dollar Amount of Project
$100.00

Donations Collected to Date
$100.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Katherine White, of Ojai, CA, USA.

If you now contribute $150 (our new price, which includes labor), your name will be placed on the waiting list to adopt the next project in order.

If you wish to contribute less than $150, the money will be applied toward the overall program.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.



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