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Zamblala Community Latrine Project - Mali

Zamblala Community Latrine Project - MaliThis project is to build 30 improved latrines in a rural Minianka village with virtually no sanitation infrastructure. It is being implemented under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Pilar Lyons.

The village of Zamblala has a population of roughly 1,200 people. It is located in rural Mali, in the cercle of Koutiala. Most of the villagers are subsistence farmers. During much of the year (November through June), precipitation is negligible. There is little or no infrastructure in the village, including a complete lack of water delivery infrastructure or sanitation infrastructure.

There are virtually no improved latrines in the village. Some households have an unimproved pit latrine with simple wood and clay slab, while other households simply wait for dark to defecate in a nearby field. The community is aware of the implications to health and well-being of the unimproved sanitation situation.

Zamblala Community Latrine Project - MaliMost latrines have neither a reinforced slab nor any kind of lining, causing erosion at the mouth, and allowing surface water to enter the latrine pit and pull contamination into the groundwater. There is also the alarming possibility of the wood and clay slab breaking and dropping one into the latrine pit itself!

Water Charity is participating in the larger project under the Peace Corps Partnership Program. Project funds will go toward purchasing cement, materials, and tools to complete the work.

The community will provide all of the unskilled labor and the locally available materials in addition to paying for the skilled labor. This includes digging both the latrine and soak away pits, and collecting the sand, gravel, and rocks. It also includes supplying at least two people to assist with concrete mixing and simple masonry tasks. Transport of materials from the market town 3 kilometers away is also a community contribution. The community portion, both cash and in kind is roughly 27% of the total project cost.

Zamblala Community Latrine Project - MaliThe project will directly serve approximately 150 people in 30 households.

Once the project is complete, the standing Water and Sanitation Committee will continue to utilize the skills and knowledge of latrine improvement gained during the project to improve other latrines in the village.

In an earlier project, Pilar and another PCV installed 10 reinforced concrete latrine slabs, leaving roughly 75 households without improved sanitation infrastructure. The rest of the households are eager to "keep up with the Joneses" in the American vernacular.

Pilar also successfully completed the Well Improvement Project – Mali.

$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Pilar of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by the PCV and/or other projects in the country of service.

Well Improvement Project – Mali

Well Improvement Project – MaliThis project is to line, cover, and reinforce five wells in a rural village in Mali. In addition to preventing further erosion and cave-ins at the mouths of the well, this will prevent contaminated surface water (and chickens!) from falling in the wells. Pulley systems will be added to make drawing water easier.

This level of infrastructure will be a new step for the poor farmers who live in the village. Some of the villagers currently take their drinking water from wide-mouthed uncovered wells without any treatment.

The project is being carried out under the direction of Pilar Lyons, a civil engineer serving as a Water Sanitation Volunteer with the Peace Corps in Mali. The village in which she lives has no running water, electricity, or roads (access is via a rutted dirt track, mostly traveled by foot, bike, and donkey cart).

Well Improvement Project – MaliHer job is to find out what sanitation improvements her community feels they need the most and help them make whatever practical changes they see as necessary. In addition to physical projects like improving wells, this includes behavior change work on things like using soap for hand-washing.

The five wells selected for this initial project belong to respected community leaders. Improving the wells of prestigious people converts a household utility item into a status symbol and increases general interest in sanitation.

Four of the wells are topped by a slab of timbers and packed earth, with an old donkey cart tire forming the mouth. Only two are lidded even occasionally. The fifth well has suffered extensive erosion at the mouth, and gapes to 3 meters (nearly 10 feet) in diameter at the surface.

Well Improvement Project – MaliLarge puddles of churned muck are a feature of several of the wells, because clothes washing and dishwashing take place next to the wells so that women don’t need to carry water a long distance before doing their work. Animals are watered at the well for the same reason. The addition of a concrete wash-area with associated infiltration pit will greatly ameliorate this problem.

The community will provide all of the labor for the project and a percentage of the materials. Project funds will go toward purchasing cement and tools to complete the work.

Once the project is complete, the standing Water and Sanitation Committee will continue to utilize the skills and knowledge of sanitary water supply gained during the project to improve other wells in the village.

$0.00 - The Water Charity participation in this project has now been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Pilar of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by the PCV and/or other projects in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Solar Pump System Repair Project - Mali

Solar Water Pump System - Mali In 1998 a solar pump-powered tap system was built by an NGO in the town of Sanadougou to provide the town with potable drinking water. However, the delivery system has broken down over time, due to lack of maintenance and repair, and now needs to be rebuilt to be effective.

The system consists of a groundwater pump and two water storage towers powered by an array of solar panels. The system includes a pump-serviced livestock-watering trough in the adjacent vicinity of the complex. In addition, there are 17 taps located in various places throughout the town.

At present, 14 out of the 17 tap heads are effectively useless, and an important pipe and the livestock-watering trough are broken beyond repair and cannot be turned off. The perpetually-flowing components create vast puddles of standing water which serve as a fertile environment for mosquito breeding.

Water Trough - Mali Since the water supply is often exhausted, the water quality of the tap water is poor due to rust build-up, and few people drink from the solar pump system. The people have resorted to the use of the use of unsanitary uncovered wells in the vicinity, causing diarrhea, giardia, dysentery and worms in the community.

This project is to rebuild the broken solar pump-to-tap system by replacing the damaged taps with new lockable tap heads and repairing broken pipes and the broken livestock-watering trough. It will be administered by Peace Corps Volunteer Zac Mason.

The Water Committee will organize a system of assigning the keys to certain community members to make sure that only responsible adults can draw tap water, and they will implement a monthly payment system, to collect money for maintenance.

Water Tap - Sanadougou, Mali The Committee will pay for the transportation of the materials from Bamako to the village of Sanadougou. They will hire a local plumber to assemble the parts and a local blacksmith to weld the necessary pieces together. The Committee will also raise money from the villagers to help with the purchase of the new heads.

This project serves a town of 4,000 people. Repairing the existing system is an extremely cost-effective solution to the critical needs of the community. It is certain to result in a reduction of morbidity and mortality in the community caused by unsafe water.

This project has now been fully funded, through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and your contribution will go toward Part 3 of this project.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Community Well Repair – Mali

Trees - MaliIn this rural village in Mali, the majority of people get their drinking water from traditional wells. These uncovered and easily-eroded wells are a major source of waterborne diseases.

Intestinal worms and other parasites are especially dangerous for children, making them susceptible to dehydration, diarrhea, and malnutrition. Additionally, unkempt well areas attract mosquitoes, increasing the incidence of malaria.

Recognizing water quality as a major obstacle to their wellbeing, the community formed a Water and Sanitation Committee in December, 2008. Since then, they have held monthly meetings to discuss the community’s sanitation problems, and have participated in two major training sessions with Peace Corps staff.

The Committee designed, implemented, and completed 19 highly successful top-well repairs. Each repair involved intense structural reinforcement as well as the installation of a metal door to protect against debris and contamination.

The committee supplemented the construction with ongoing educational activities and monitoring of water treatment and sanitation behaviors.

Well - MaliThe success of the first project generated such a positive response that the community is enthusiastically ready to expand their efforts. In this project, 35 top-well repairs will be done in the central village and surrounding hamlets.

The villagers are contributing 26% of the total budget, consisting of labor, gravel, boulders, transportation of materials, as well as a small amount of funds.

After the completion of the top-well repairs, the committee will monitor water quality and perform chlorine treatments. In addition, they will collect money from users to be utilized for repairs and future development.

The project is being carried out under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer E. Hurley.

This project restores ineffective wells to use as a resource for the community. The dynamic planning and implementation of the prior project, together with a large community contribution toward the project show their commitment. Their demonstrated fiscal responsibility, educational participation, and pre-planning for monitoring and maintenance all come together to ensure sustainability.

$0.00 - The Water Charity participation in this project has been fully funded, through the generosity of <The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

Any additional donations using the Donate button below will be used to fund other projects by this PCV and/or other PCVs in this country.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

School Latrines Project in Mali

Mali LandscapeMali, located in Western Africa, is a landlocked nation, the seventh largest country in Africa. It borders on Algeria on the north, Niger on the east, Burkina Faso and the Côte d'Ivoire on the south, Guinea on the south-west, and Senegal and Mauritania on the west.

This project is being done in a very poor community, currently suffering under drought conditions. A secondary school was recently constructed, but there are not yet latrines for the schoolyard.

Diarrhea and dysentery are prevalent due to lack of sanitation.

Two sanitary latrines will be constructed at a secondary school, one for boys and one for girls. In addition handwashing stations will be built.

Project funds will be used to purchase cement, rebar, tin roofing, doors, paint, and other construction materials.

Villagers will go to the fields to provide 100 donkey carts of sand, 60 carts of gravel, and 12 carts of large rocks.

Farming in MaliLocal well-diggers will dig the latrine pits. Local masons will construct the latrines and hand-washing stations. The villagers will pay for the transportation of all purchased materials. Through the extensive use of local labor and resources, sustainability will be ensured.

The project is being done under the supervision of Peace Corps Volunteer Z. Mason.

As a result of this project, 7th through 9th grade students will be able to practice proper hygiene and thereby reduce disease transmission. Girls will especially benefit from the privacy afforded by the enclosed latrines.

The participation of Water Charity in this project has now been funded, through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

Any donations using the Donate button below will go toward additional water and sanitation projects in Mali.

This project has been completed. To read about the conclusion of this project, CLICK HERE.

Soak Pits Project - Mali

In this communty in Mali, there are great amounts of standing water, which can be a breeding ground for mosquitoes, and create an increased risk of malaria.

Mali mapThe project is to construct 475 soak pits. A soak pit is a method of removing ground water by draining it down into the earth.

The funds provided by Water Charity are being used to purchase piping, cement, and plastic tarping needed to complete the pits. The project is being directed by Peace Corps Volunteer Jennifer O’Keeffe.

The construction of the soak pits will serve as both an opportunity to teach the specific methodology, and also as a focus to teach other clean water practices.

A soak pit is one way to reduce wastewater by sending it underground, purifying it, and ultimately into the water table. It is a large hole filled with rocks, with a pipe leading into it. The hole is covered with plastic and dirt, so that only wastewater entering the pipe can enter the hole.

Soak pits can last for years, resulting in such long-term benefits as a cleaner, more aesthetically pleasing environment, a reduction of mosquito breeding grounds and decreased risks of malaria.

Soak PitIn preparation for the project, an assigned leader form the community, together with the volunteer O’Keeffe, visited every traditional latrine in the village to assess the need for soak pits, resulting in the list of soak pits to be built.

The community is providing all the labor in constructing the soak pits. They will also supply the sandstone which fills the pits to filter and absorb the unclean water. In addition, they are assisting in the purchasing and transporting materials.

There is extensive community participation, both in the planning and implementation. There will be little need for maintenance, and the effects will be long lasting. The village is providing materials, labor, and transportation, ensuring continued commitment and resulting in sustainability.

This project gives immediate relief from a major problem confronting the village, that of the spread of disease through standing water. In addition, it provides training and teaching opportunities.

The Water Charity involvement as the majority participant in this project has been funded, through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

Any additional donations using the Donate button below will be used to fund other projects by this PCV and/or other PCVs in the host country.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.




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